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What Is This

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Higgins, Feb 17, 2016.

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  1. Higgins

    Higgins

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    Feb 17, 2016
    Hello All,

    This is a photo of the inside of a small 6 volt servo, the kind used in RC cars and airplanes. Can anyone tell me what the small black disk is? It's soldered between the motor and the positive and negative wires .

    IMG_7987.JPG

    Thanks for your help.

    Higgins
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    This is typically a capacitor to reduce electromagnetic interference (high freqeuncy noise). Atthis level of detail in the photo nothing mor ecan be said.
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    1,958
    Sep 5, 2009
    Tho, in this case, I would 99.99% guarantee that is it a bridge rectifier, it appears to be a similar size to the WO4 one
    a bit of a giveaway is that the inputs and outputs are opposite
     
    Minder likes this.
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    11,662
    2,697
    Nov 17, 2011
    Not completely unlikely, given the pinout as you observed (I admit I didn't look that closely the first time). But how then would the motor be able to turn in both directions, as required for a servo?
    Maybe it's an "integrated" LC-filter?

    @Higgins : Are there any markings on the component that may help identigy it more reliably?
     
  5. cjdelphi

    cjdelphi

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    Oct 26, 2011
    Maybe it only turns in one direction the rest is by hand? What is it anyway?
     
  6. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    It could be an embedded control chip.
     
  7. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    +1 for a bridge rectifier.!
    M.
     
  8. Higgins

    Higgins

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    Feb 17, 2016
    Thanks for getting back to me. I'm sorry, I don't see any identification on the part. If a bridge rectifier would always make the servo turn clockwise, regardless of the mini plug being wired center positive or center negative, then that must be it. I build remote controlled bird releasers for gun dog training and the different brands of electronics wire their receivers different ways, some center positive, some center negative. I hack the servos and basically just use the motors. It would be great if I didn't have to worry about wiring center positive or center negative. I could just wire them all the same. The picture in my original post shows a servo someone hacked and they must have made it for a similar application.

    Here is a video of one of the bird releasers so you can get a better idea of how it works.


    Thanks again for the help.

    Higgins
     
  9. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Yes, an old trick to insure polarity to a device regardless of the DC input supply polarity.
    M.
     
    davenn likes this.
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