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What is this device inside our well pump controller box?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by kingmoa, Sep 21, 2017.

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  1. kingmoa

    kingmoa

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    Sep 21, 2017
    Inside our well pump controller box, there is this device (Picture 1 and 2 right below). I believe it is engaged and starts the well pump when the pressure switch (in the water tank) senses that the water level is low. Somehow the device (in picture 1) is not engaged and if f I do it manually (picture 2 with a pencil) then the pump starts working.

    Picture 1: WHAT IS THIS??? from iphone 514.JPG

    Picture 2: Manually engaged (by using a pencil) IMG_0611.JPG

    Picture 3: This device (in the middle) connected to to fuse box(top left) and controller (top right). I believe it also somehow connected to pressure switch as well. (Not shown) IMG_0484.JPG

    Question: We want to replace this device but not sure what is it? Any ideas? Where can we purchase it (or something equivalent as it could be pretty old)?
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Good way to blow your head off ( if you are lucky).
    Part is a 240v contactor , 2 pole but 3 would possibly be more common, possibly around 30 amp by the look of the contacts, with a 240v control coil.
    Sure the external control is working or that there is control voltage?
     
  3. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Not true - most contactors have a manual operating button for testing purposes and the contacts are fully shrouded. But yes, it is a contactor - basically a large relay.

    Are there any markings on it? I see a label but can't make out the details.
     
  4. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir kingmoa . . . . .

    Looking at the units 220V contact pairs on both of those units . . . they both look pretty good.

    You just need to check and see if 120 VAC AC activation voltage for the coils is getting thru to the RED circled contacts on each unit.
    The contactors/ relay coil is a 9998 which is a 120VAC coil

    If so you might just have a . . . . . replaceable . . . . . . solenoid coil, being open.
    DISCONNECT TOTALLY from power and test for any AC voltage presence . . .3 times . . .you can then use an ohmmeter to check for coil continuity of the two units.

    I can't see but one unit having a bad coil, therefore one good unit will provide an ohmmic benchmark for the other unit, with no ohms being indicative of an open coil winding.

    You have your pencil across the unit . . . . a safer manual test would be using a wooden / plastic / insulatted rod to press in the center portion where a white center dot is being on one unit.

    On the new unit at the bottom that is being more noticable.

    PHOTO MARK UP REFERENCING

    [​IMG]


    73's de Edd
     
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  5. kingmoa

    kingmoa

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    Sep 21, 2017
    THANKS YOU so much for all the responses, it HELPS!! I goggled all night and found nothing till I ran across this forum. Anyway, I found the 9998-DA1V09 part and will test it as 73's de Edd suggested. I'll also look for the replacement unit but can't tell what is the part number as posted in EDD's last picture. I'll keep looking.

    THANKS AGAIN!!!
     
  6. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    As Bluejets, is the level switch circuit working OK?
    Careful when using a Pencil as a probe, the lead is conductive!
    M.
     
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  7. kingmoa

    kingmoa

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    Sep 21, 2017
    Thanks for the advice Bluejets and Minder.
     
  8. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Bit irresponsible to encourage this type of action don't you think? Apart from the dangers of operating a contactor by hand with a pencil, the casing has no arc barriers with the contacts fully visible. I have seen the results from when the inexperienced have attempted such things and the sight of missing fingers, ears and literally nothing but a fused conglomerate of what used to be a control board is not a pretty sight.
     
  9. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    1. the pencil was used bodily across non-conductive surfaces
    2. the contactor is still available therefore isn't 'unsafe' for any in-spec situations or wouldn't be allowed for sale
    3. it's 240V and 1.5" between contacts - arcing???? ....it's not 'kV @ 10's of amps'
    4. if they weren't supposed to be activated manually they wouldn't make that possible

    Whilst I appreciate the consequences of improper use it is too easy to conflate a normal situation into a potentially disasterous one and I saw no potential for such in the OPs post/images. OK, they could have used a more appropriate 'pusher' but the OP shows 'common sense' in their questions and actions therefore over-exaggerating the potential for danger doesn't seem appropriate.
     
  10. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    I have never been a fan of manual operation of any device, I have always thought of them as a visual indication as to whether they are engaged or not. but the contactors I use (Telemecanique) , the 'actuator' is generally used for auxiliary device use, to attach a aux contact or timer etc.
    M.
     
  11. Minder

    Minder

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    Apr 24, 2015
    Another point against pushing the armature of a contactor over is this seldom proves anything as generally the reason for non-pickup is in the control circuit, also, if fitted, modern O/L;s do not disconnect the power, but drop the control circuit, therefore if a motor exists that has a locked rotor and the O/L has tripped, pushing the contactor armature over can have dire consequences.
    M.
     
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