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What is this component

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by terry worley, Oct 19, 2020.

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  1. terry worley

    terry worley

    1
    0
    Oct 19, 2020
    I am working on a Williams system 7 Gorgar Pinball machine. I have everything working but after playing five to seven games all sound stops, both speech and pinball sounds. I have traced the problem down to under the playfield is a unknown electric component that gets extremely hot to the touch when the sound stops. I turn off the pinball machine and the thing cools quickly and the sound returns. I think it is a small capacitor, but not sure it is purple in color and has the number 3301 on the side. This is soldered across two wires that go to the sound board. upload_2020-10-18_21-18-53.png upload_2020-10-18_21-18-53.png
     
  2. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    3,046
    1,287
    Aug 21, 2015
    That reminds me of a small wattage vitreous coated wire wound resistor.
    Pull all power and take an ohmmetter and see how close it comes to reading 330 ohms. . . . .or also possibly 33 ohms.
    If so then, tell us about the audio amplifier used in the unit.

    More info please . . .
    The parts right side wire lead seems to go to a YELLOW wire.
    Is the left lead wire going to a BLACK wire ?. . . . as its view is questionable.
    If so, what pins do these two wires connect into on the sound module.
    CONSIDERING that is going to be the 9 pin connector . . . . . .10J1.
    If not, what is that connector number ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2020
    TCSC47 likes this.
  3. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,795
    503
    Jan 15, 2010
    My 2-cents worth.
    The symptom you describe sounds to me like a semiconductor failing (overheating).
    What you're probably noticing is that resistor overheating due to excessive current through it, due to a failing semiconductor
    elsewhere in the circuit. Typically the semiconductor works fine until it heats-up, then goes haywire.
    I'd spend less time looking at the resistor, and trace the circuit back to a semiconductor that is also getting extremely hot.
    Good luck with the search.
     
    davenn likes this.
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