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What exactly is the difference between these two omron relays?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Farukh Khan, Aug 20, 2018.

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  1. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
  2. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    The difference between the two is the G5LE-1-VDDC12 has VDE in the approvals listing where as the other one does not.
     
  3. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    I didn't get it @WHONOES can you please elaborate?
     
  4. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    I can't elaborate any more, the situation is exactly as I explained. Try downloading the datasheet as I did and examine it (one datasheet covers all variations), particularly the explanation of how the part numbers are made up. All will be revealed then.
     
    Cannonball likes this.
  5. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    @WHONOES as far as I can see, both the datasheet of those two relays are indicating the VDE approval listing.


    Anyway, can you help me understand the difference between these two relays?
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le-14dc12/omron
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le1412dc/omron

    I cannot seem to find any difference rather than the DC12 and 12DC at the end. Getting really confused here even with the datasheets.

    This is a Flux Protection sealed relay:
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le-1-edc12/omron
    Will this Flux Protection sealing and high capacity of the relay has any advantage over the fully sealed relays I mentioned above? Which one is better and in what terms exactly?


    Thank You.
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    they are both VDE approved ....

    hmmmm ....... the listed datasheets from those 2 links in the OP is identical

    so did you go searching for a datasheet from somewhere else ?
     
  7. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
    Yeah but those datasheets also showing the same thing. @davenn
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    that's what I said ;)
     
  9. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
    @davenn I mean't other datasheets outside from the Arrow website. I checked from various websites and they all indicate basically the same thing.
     
  10. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    The question should be "what is it YOU want from these relays"?
     
  11. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
  12. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    If the relays have the right coil voltage, the correct contact arrangement and (perhaps) the appropriate pin spacing then decide whether you need one that is 'approved' or not - I suggest neither makes a bit of difference to you so I'd chose the CHEAPEST relay.
     
  13. Minder

    Minder

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    If a relay has the flux protection nub, if using in a clean or dust free environment it is recommended that it is removed by clipping or simply cutting off before putting into use.
    This is preferable, as it prevents ionization collection in the sealed interior, particularly when switching high loads.
    M.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
  14. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
    @Minder The relay module will be used in a very dusty and polluted air environment. So, should I go for fully sealed one?


    @kellys_eye I have to choose from these three relays: (they have appropriate voltage and pin measurement for my board) (Also, the environment where the relay module will be used is quite dusty and humid)

    These two are fully sealed model. If possible please let me know the difference between these two. Cause the datasheet shows both of them are same but there's a pricing difference and the model number has DC12 in one and 12DC in another.
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le-14dc12/omron
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le1412dc/omron

    This is Flux Protected Sealed relay:
    https://www.arrow.com/en/products/g5le-1-edc12/omron


    Thank You.
     
  15. Minder

    Minder

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    Probably the fully sealed.
    M.
     
  16. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
    @Minder There's two fully sealed relays. Which one exactly? and could anyone find the difference between those two? I couldn't get to find anything regarding that in the datasheets.
     
  17. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Use the one on the left, unless there's a reason to use the other one.
     
    kellys_eye likes this.
  18. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
  19. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Your left. Pick one at random. As has been suggested, pick the cheapest.

    Unless you know of a reason to choose another one, or you have been advised that your application needs something special, then there's really nothing else to go on.

    If you're building a lot or if it is really expensive, make a prototype and test it. Or hire an engineer. Or both.

    There may be dozens of things which may be important, and unless someone knows all (or most) of the details, it may be really hard to make a determination.

    As an example, how often is the relay switched, under what load, at what temperatures, and what reliability is required? You've mentioned the board is in a dusty and humid environment. What sort of dust, how humid, is it subject to rapid temperature changes, or instances where you could get condensation? Are you considering a conformal coating, or even potting? How is maintenance to be carried out? Does the device need to pass any safety standards, CE Mark, ROHS, etc? How is the device to be constructed, and do the required parts exist in a packaging suitable for automatic insertion? What stage in the lifecycle is the component? Is there a second source? How available is it (is it in the quantity you require)? Is the supply chain reliable and secure? What is the expected service lifetime of the device? Are there different relays used where a single relay type can reduce the BOM or allow better quantity pricing? Is a relay actually required? What about it's weight? Or maybe vibration resistance?

    That's just a few off the top of my head. I don't know what's relevant to you, or what other things may need consideration.
     
  20. Farukh Khan

    Farukh Khan

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    Jun 12, 2015
    @(*steve*) you are the boss xD. You thought about those things just now? WoW


    The relays will be used in a home automation project. But will be located outside the house. The outside area is pretty dusty and polluted according to the global pollution index. Also the overall country is very humid with summer(field cracking) and winter(no snow) of two months each.

    I will pick the cheapest then. Thanks for suggesting.
     
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