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Water pump question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Hopup, Feb 14, 2018.

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  1. Hopup

    Hopup

    253
    36
    Jul 5, 2015
    Hi, I don't know much about pumps so I need some help.

    I would like to have water pump which I can control electrically. I want the pump to have constant pressure while the flow rate can be changed accurately. Is the Diaphragm Water pump right choice? Can the controlling be done using PWM?

    I was thinking pump like this one: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-12V-W...lf-Priming-Caravan-Camping-Boat-/141827538125

    That pump says it has pressure switch valve which I wouldn't need probably.
     
  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,744
    482
    Jan 15, 2010
    You don't mention anything about your application. The description of the pump you linked to says it shouldn't run dry, and it seems to me is intended for intermittent service, not continuous use.
    Your desire for constant pressure yet ability to change the flow rate seems to be pretty application specific, and I for one would want to know the application before recommending a solution.
     
  3. Alec_t

    Alec_t

    2,844
    760
    Jul 7, 2015
    Define 'constant pressure'. Mechanical pumps of the diaphragm, peristaltic or piston type would produce distinct periodic pressure pulses. Is that acceptable?
     
  4. Hopup

    Hopup

    253
    36
    Jul 5, 2015
    The application is kind of water spraying/cooling system where the water is fed into atomizing jets to say it simple way.

    Should have not posted half sleep, what I do actually need is system what can change the water pressure while maintaining constant flow rate I guess. Pressure should be between 2-10 bars and should have electrical input to adjust it. Flow rate of 0.2 to 5 LPM will be needed depending of the pressure of atomizing system.

    Iā€™m mainly looking cheap way to do this.
     
  5. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    4,095
    859
    Oct 5, 2014
    If you increase flow rate into a given system, pressure will increase.
    If you decrease the flow rate, pressure will decrease.
     
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