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Water Makes Airbags Deploy?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], Jul 9, 2013.

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  1. Guest

  2. Sylvia Else

    Sylvia Else Guest

  3. Martin Brown

    Martin Brown Guest

    He wants to "ensure people" - is this some strange left pondian usage?

    "everything under control" also seems a very bold claim under the
    circumstances - I'd hate to see what out of control looked like!

    I expect airbags do go off if you slam into a wall of water at 40mph.
    They might also go off if the right bit of wiring harness gets wet. I
    have lost a mudflap once in a flash flood. Certain cars like Renault
    Meganes with low air intakes tend to end up bobbing up and down in the
    local deep car trap if they try to go through after a bad storm. The
    engine is usually a total writeoff and the car pretty messy inside too.
     
  4. Yesterday I drove (very slowly) through 2+ feet of muddy water running
    sideways like a river across the road.. not nice, and not where you'd
    expect it. They had to rescue ~1,000 people from a commuter train with
    rafts. Most intense rainfall ever recorded (~5" in 2-3 hours). I've
    seen some sh*t in the last 24 hours..
     
  5. Guest

    Latest headline "Tampering alleged in fiery Quebec train crash" , the Lac-Megantic calamity. Seems someone was tampering with at least one locomotive after the train was parked for the night. Wow, Canada is such a great place, hardly any crime, huh.
     
  6. Bob Quintal

    Bob Quintal Guest

    wrote in
    From one news headline published this morning:
    The chairman of the company whose train exploded in downtown Lac-
    Mégantic says he is certain it was tampered with.

    A later headline:
    Firefighters in the nearby town of Nantes put out a separate blaze on
    the train shortly before it crashed into Lac-Megantic early Saturday.
    Ed Burkhardt, chief executive officer and president of Rail World,
    the parent company of the Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railway, told
    media outlets there's evidence the engine powering the brakes was
    shut down at some point.
    http://www.cnn.com/2013/07/09/world/americas/canada-runaway-
    train/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

    Pressed to elaborate by CTV, Burkhardt wrote Tuesday in an e-mail
    exchange, "We are now aware the firefighters shut down the
    locomotive.

    So the firemen are guilty of tampering with a badly maintained
    locomotive by putting out a fire.

    Rrrrrriiiiight!!!!!!!! (Bill Cosby)
     
  7. P E Schoen

    P E Schoen Guest

    "Bob Quintal" wrote in message
    It will be interesting to get more details as the investigation continues. I
    was not fully familiar with the Westinghouse air brake system so I read up
    on it:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railway_air_brake

    The individual car brakes should be applied automatically if the pressure in
    the main brake line drops below a certain threshold, and each car has its
    own reservoir of compressed air to exert maximum force on the brakes.
    However, if the valve between, say, the engine and the cars is closed, the
    system will be "fooled", as happened in the infamous accident in DC in 1953:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Pennsylvania_Railroad_train_wreck

    I think rail cars also have the old-fashioned manual parking brakes actuated
    by a handwheel, which should have been used if the train was parked for any
    length of time. But people are lazy and crews are sparse, so this was
    probably not done. There are also wheel chocks that would have prevented
    this.

    Although sabotage and terrorism have been so far not suspected, this may
    have been an attempt to push for the Keystone pipeline which would reduce
    the rail transport of crude oil across Canada, to the less risky (for
    Canada) of having it pumped across the US to refineries and ships in the
    Gulf of Mexico where it will be taken to foreign customers. The benefits of
    this pipeline to the US are minimal and temporary in the form of local jobs,
    but the environmental impact of the inevitable oil spills could be
    disastrous.

    Seems like an awful lot of accidents lately (the airliner crash in SF), as
    well as a lot of extreme weather like the deluge in Toronto and disasters
    like the deadly CO wildfires. AGW? End of Days?

    Paul
     
  8. Guest

    The original fire was arson. And since when does a fire occur in a component of 7500 tons of freight payload, parked on a slope, and the train companydoesn't bother to come and check the situation until the next morning???
     
  9. Guest

    Enough evidence has been discovered to start a criminal investigation. Thiswas no accident. From USA Today:
    Quebec police Inspector Michel Forget said that investigators have "discovered elements" that have led to a criminal probe. He gave no details but ruled out terrorism.
    SFO- another minimalist Boeing design delaying alarms and other pilot warning until 1.5 seconds before crash...ummmm, talk about next to worthless.
     
  10. rickman

    rickman Guest

    Over 2 feet! Do you have any idea of how dangerous that was? Were you
    in a 4WD truck or a passenger car? Most cars will start to lift off
    their tires in over 2 feet of water and be swept away. It happens all
    the time.
     
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