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Want to test a Hall Effect Sensor

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by slim_jim_56, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. slim_jim_56

    slim_jim_56

    11
    0
    Feb 10, 2010
    I have a "523 A" Hall effect sensor and would like to test it. I may have destroyed the one I have and only have a few left. I am a beginner in electronics and don't understand all the info on the data sheets. Does anyone have a simple circuit for testing a Hall sensor that I can make?
    Thanks
    Jim
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,192
    2,694
    Jan 21, 2010
    Is this the datasheet you don't understand?

    If not, then please post a link to it. My wife is using the crystal ball at the moment.
     
  3. slim_jim_56

    slim_jim_56

    11
    0
    Feb 10, 2010
    If not, then please post a link to it. My wife is using the crystal ball at the momen

    Yeah, I guess you get a lot of people asking questions without giving you a hint at what they are talking about. Sorry to be one of them.

    Data-sheet at;
    http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/MicronasIntermetall/mXuxyww.pdf

    I have a 523 Hall Sensor. I do not understand how to test it to find out if I burned it out or not.
    I can't seem to get it to respond to a S pole of a magnet. I have the Input (#1 I think) hooked up to + on a 9V battery and the middle pin (#2) hooked up to - on the same battery. Then I try to get a voltage reading from pin #3 and pin # 2 and don't get a reading either with the S pole, N pole or no magnet at all.
    http://www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/MicronasIntermetall/mXuxyww.pdf
    I have made a testing board for a 555 timer and one for a 14017 decade counter so I was wondering if any one knew of a simple circuit for testing this Hall effect sensor.
     
  4. 55pilot

    55pilot

    434
    3
    Feb 23, 2010
    The output is open drain. You need an external pull-up resistor on the output to see the state of the output.

    ---55p
     
  5. slim_jim_56

    slim_jim_56

    11
    0
    Feb 10, 2010
    Thanks, I was looking for a + voltage coming from #3 and it is actually opening up to the negative rail. It looks like I didn't damage my Hall sensor after all. Just my pride. Well this is what this forum is for isn't it? For you guys who know what's happening to help the new guys to get back on the horse and stay in the rodeo.
    Thanks Again
    Jim
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,192
    2,694
    Jan 21, 2010
    Connect pin 1 to +5V (actually anything from 5V to 20V would be fine)

    Connect pin 2 to 0V

    Connect a 50K resistor from +V to pin 3.

    Using a multimeter, measure the voltage between pin 2 and 3 while you bring a magnet close to the device.

    If you see a state change (i.e. a swing from almost 0 to almost the full supply voltage), the device is probably working.
     
  7. mickhel

    mickhel

    1
    0
    Mar 20, 2010
    You can detect and measure all kinds of things with the Hall-effect using what's known as a Hall-effect sensor or probe. These terms are sometimes used interchangeably but, strictly speaking, refer to different things:

    * Hall-effect sensors are simple, inexpensive, electronic chips that are used in all sorts of widely available gadgets and products.
    * Hall-effect probes are more expensive and sophisticated instruments used in scientific laboratories for things like measuring magnetic field strength with very high precision.
     
  8. webmasterpdx

    webmasterpdx

    12
    0
    Dec 19, 2010
    Hall Effect sensors

    Beware of just using the sensor chip itself. It's voltage change can be very small for a large magnetic field, so you'll typically need some amplification. Then, if your sensor is to be used in the real world, you'll either have to build a self calibrating sensor using a torroid with a few coils on it, or just use an open loop sensor (easier, but it'll require calibration).

    I'm working on a project doing the latter. Adjusting for temperature changes is really tough....
    -D
     
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