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Wall Wart Replacement source NOT RS

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by [email protected], Sep 15, 2004.

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  1. Guest

    I am looking to replace the following AC/DC wall wart:

    Bothhand Enterprises Inc
    Model M1-10S05
    AC Input 120VAC
    Output: 5 VDC 2.0 AMPS


    I am not interested in paying Radio Shack $22.00 for the privilege of replacing
    a $3.00 item. Or several other places for $15+ plus s/h.

    If possible I would like to replace with same item, but will consider
    equivalents. OEM is wholesale only, as are many of its dealers." Sure how many
    1000 do you want? 1, SINGLE, ONE. Sorry, min. 1 shipful."

    Any useful suggestions (minus Google & Froogle) on sources for replacements
    welcomed.

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. Mike S.

    Mike S. Guest

    Regulated or unregulated?
    www.jameco.com

    If it isn't on their website, ask for their printed catalog. There are 9
    pages (small print) of wall wart and tabletop power supplies in the
    current edition.
     
  3. Have you tried the usual suspects? Digkey, Mouser, or Newark.





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  4. I think you're overly optimistic on the price.

    Run of the mill, and cheap, tend to be low current. Once you get up to 1amp,
    I'd say the price rises. And by 2amps, they are less common so the price goes
    up even further.

    Given that this is a 5vdc adaptor, it's also not likely to be run of the mill.
    The voltage suggests it runs logic devices, and hence needs that 5v to be
    regulated, which will add to the cost. The cheap adaptors don't regulate,
    and so use less circuitry.

    Michael
     
  5. Blake

    Blake Guest

    BC Micro has a 5V 2A wall wart for $3.99 with 1.6mm plug.

    See it at http://www.bgmicro.com/pdf/page13.pdf .

    I don't know about their minimum purchase or handling charge, but it might
    be worth it for you to have a look.
     
  6. From the current rating (2.0 A), it sounds like a regulated switcher. This
    is not a $3 item. This one should cost $20-$40 in single quantities.

    I'm not sure he realized that this is not like the cheap wall warts (like 9
    V unregulated 300 mA) that we so often see.
     
  7. 5 volts at 2 amps, regulated, is not a $3 item. It sounds like a regulated
    switcher that should cost $20-$40.
     
  8. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    www.allelectronics.com 5V 4A $8.50
    www.bgmicro.com 5V 3A $4.99
    5V 2A $3.99

    I didn't check www.mpja.com but they might have something also

    Norm
     
  9. Of course, you are pointing to two companies that I think of as
    surplus outlets

    I'm with Michael, 5v at 2Amps is not so common, and not so cheap, at
    "regular" places like Radio Shack. The fact that one can apparently
    can get them at surplus outlets does not mean $20 or whatever is
    overpriced.

    I've bought plenty of simple switching supplies at the local surplus
    outlet for a couple of dollars each, but that doesn't mean I can expect
    to get them everywhere for such a low price.

    Michael
     
  10. Clarence

    Clarence Guest


    Well I think you miss the point. The reason you can get them so easily surplus
    is that in quantities of about 500 they are $2.56 from at least six different
    suppliers. But if you want only a few. The surplus house is the better deal
    since the manufactured have a minimum billing or sell samples for $20 to $50.
    The fair price if you want a custom, but common, the surplus is a deal!
     
  11. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    Of course not. But for the OP's one-off, it's probably the best deal he can
    get. That who the post was addressed to.

    Norm
     
  12. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    Output: 5 VDC 2.0 AMPS
    :The voltage suggests it runs logic devices,
    :and hence needs that 5v to be regulated
    : Michael Black

    Before I hooked a cheap unit to anything critical,
    I'd check its output open-circuit and full-load (2.5 ohm 10W resistor).
    If it's outside the 4.75V - 5.25V spec for TTL, I'd reconsider.

    Even if the cheapie won't do this job, you're not out much $,
    and you can keep it for other stuff or re-sell it.
     
  13. Norm Dresner

    Norm Dresner Guest

    I won't say that I've bought hundreds of wall warts from these supplies, but
    it does run into several dozen with a variety of specifications and there's
    been no bad ones (yet). I doubt that they check each unit and I assume that
    each one has gone through whatever it's manufacturer deems an appropriate
    quality control procedure, but I do look at every one with a scope to see if
    the output looks reasonable and I do meter the voltage. I think I'd do this
    if I bought them from Jameco or Digikey too. And many of these are "name"
    brand units that were surplus, not just cheap knock-offs.

    Norm
     
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