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Volts and Amps

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by John Steaver, Oct 28, 2015.

  1. John Steaver

    John Steaver

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    Oct 28, 2015
    Could you add amps onto volt or take away amps from volts?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    hi John,
    welcome

    no it doesn't work quite like that

    here's the Ohms Law Triangle showing how Volts, Amps (current) and Resistance interact with each other

    Ohms Law Triangle.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
  3. John Steaver

    John Steaver

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    Oct 28, 2015
    so what would happen if you tried? Would it still be the same voltage?
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    As I said, you cannot, it doesn't work that way

    now lets look at a practical circuit

    cct1.GIF

    So using the Ohms law triangle from my first post
    can you tell me the current flowing in this circuit ?



    Dave
     
  5. John Steaver

    John Steaver

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    Oct 28, 2015
    1 amp?
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    yes :)

    now change the battery voltage to 25V
    what is the current flowing now ?

    Dave
     
  7. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    You have to write a question using voltage and amps and we will correct it.
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    note that in a series circuit, the current flow is the same everywhere
    so the current flowing through A1 at the top is the same as the current flowing through A2 at the bottom
     
  9. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    he's doing OK Colin, don't confuse him yet, lets work out way up
     
  10. John Steaver

    John Steaver

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    Oct 28, 2015
    2.5 amps? I think I get now, thanks for replying so quickly :)
     
    davenn and Martaine2005 like this.
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Yup :)
    so experiment with changing the resistor value, whilst keeping the voltage value constant
    see the effect that has on the current value

    cheers
    Dave
     
    Arouse1973 and Martaine2005 like this.
  12. BobK

    BobK

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    Despite others attempts to answer, I have no clue what you are asking.

    Amps and volts measure two different things, it makes no sense to add one to the other or subtract one from the other. So the answer is yes, you could, but the result would be totally meaningless. For example what is 10V + 5A (the answer is 15, but 15 what?)

    Please explain what you are really thinking (which is what I think Colin was trying to ask.)

    Bob
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    he's now on the right path, Bob,
    He just didn't understand the relationship between volts and amps :)


    Dave
     
  14. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    I think you are doing a great job Dave of being a monitor! Make sure the threads don't go off track.
    He will learn faster without being confused by people like @CDRIVE .

    Keep up the good work. :)
     
  15. duke37

    duke37

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    I am 1.8m tall and weigh 99kg. How can I add these? In fact, I need to do some subtraction:D.
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  16. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    hahaha yeah me too. if I was 99kg, I would be extremely happy (anywhere between 100 - 110kg would be awesome)

    D
     
  17. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    lol and this one is heading that way too, so lets stop whilst we are ahead :)
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  18. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    I'm here because the forum alerts said that Marty quoted me, mentioned my name or ... hell I don't know but I'm here, so let's try this. Way back when Dinosaurs ruled I was teaching basic industrial electronics. To help my students relate to the material world I told them to think of electrical circuits as plumbing, where Voltage is pressure, like (PSI) pounds per square inch. Current in Amps is equivalent to water "flowing" though the pipes and measured in gallons per minute (GPM). And finally Resistance (R) as being equivalent to how much water you can push through a 1/2" pipe in one minute as compared to a 2" pipe. The smaller the pipe the higher the resistance (Restriction) to water flow. The larger the pipe, the lower the resistance (restriction) to water flow. Think of a 1Ω resistor as a big pipe and a 10KΩ resistor as a small pipe.

    So if you grasp this you will see that "arbitrarily" doing math on any three of of the Ohms Law (a brilliant guy) elements is meaningless. Heck, that's why it called Ohm's "LAW". :) If you violate it you go to electronics San Quentin. :D

    Chris
     
    Martaine2005 likes this.
  19. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    SHhh..........:D
     
  20. BobK

    BobK

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    Yes, and they will tack on a charge of resisting arrest.

    Bob
     
    CDRIVE likes this.
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