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Voltage Regulation Using Diodes Problem

Discussion in 'Electronics Homework Help' started by alkozy, May 31, 2017.

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  1. alkozy

    alkozy

    3
    0
    May 31, 2017
    hi everyone
    can someone please help me with this problem
    what i know about the problem: that the diodes have 0.7 voltage each as Vd
    diodes 3 and 4 only will conduct if the input voltage Va is positive. in this case there will be an output voltage at both C and B ( C is that output before the 1k ohm R )
    for a negative voltage diodes 1 and 2 only will conduct and for this case there will be output voltage at B only how much???
    this is what i am asking for
     

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  2. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
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    Jan 9, 2011
    The diodes drop 0.7V each so 1.4V total.
    When D1,D2 conduct you have the input voltage minus the diode drop across the 5k resistor so you can sketch the resulting voltage.
    Have a go at this and then we can move on to D3,D4.
     
  3. alkozy

    alkozy

    3
    0
    May 31, 2017
    I hope the pic is clear
     

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  4. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
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    Jan 9, 2011
    The picture is not clear, use a fatter pen.
    The question asks for a sketch of a sine wave of peak voltage 5V so start with the voltage on a vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis.
    You seem to have plotted the forward/backward characteristics of a diode. This was not asked for.
     
    Harald Kapp likes this.
  5. Laplace

    Laplace

    1,252
    184
    Apr 4, 2010
    Screenshot from 2017-06-02 20-09-18.png
    See if you can sketch your answer on this as a background.
     
  6. Electrical Engineer David

    Electrical Engineer David

    11
    1
    May 29, 2017
    When the current reaches 0.1 mA the voltage across D3 and D4 will be 1.4 V. Assuming ideal diodes the voltage across D3 and D4 will remain at 1.4 V above 0.1 mA of diode current. Where will the current reach 0.1 mA? The answer is, when (Va-1.4)/(5000 + 1000) = 0.1 mA. Solving you find that when Va reaches 2 V then the diodes will be fully forward biased. So between 0 and 1.4 V on the input (i.e. Va) we can assume little to no current flow meaning Vb = Va and Vc = 0. At about 1.4 Va to 2 Va the diodes will begin to conduct. Above Va = 2 V the diodes will be fully saturated and what you have here can be thought of as a voltage divider output. So at Va=2V Vb will be 1.5V and Vc will be at 0.1 V. At any Va above 2 V the portion of the sine wave above 2V will be divided by (5000 + 1000)/1000 = 6. So any Va above 2 V will increase Vb above 2 V by an amount = (Va - 2 V)/6. Vc will increase from 0.1 V by an equal amount since the voltage across the diodes is assumed to be a constant 1.4 V.

    During the negative portion of the sine wave D3 and D4 will be reversed biased and no current flows through the lower resistor. So again Vb = Va and Vc will be 0 V when Va is greater than -1.4 V. When Va goes more negative than -1.4 V D1 and D2 will begin to conduct. Here there is no voltage division so Vb will just be clipped and remain at about -1.4 V.

    Vb:
    To summarize, Vb will mimic Va between +1.4 Va and -1.4 Va. Between Va = 1.4 V and Va = 2.0 V, Vb will rise to 1.5 V. Above Va = 2 V, Vb will rise from 1.5 V to 1.5+(Va-2)/6. So for a 5 volt sine wave input the peak voltage will be reached at about 1.5 + (5-2)/6 = 2.0 VDC. Below -1.4 Va, Vb will remain at -1.4 VDC.

    Vc:
    From Va = 0 to Va = 1.4 V, Vc = 0 Volts. Between Va = 1.4 V and Va = 2.0 V, Vc will rise to 0.1 V. Above Va = 2.0 V, Vc will rise from 0.1 V to 0.1+(Va-2)/6. So for a 5 Volt sine wave input the peak voltage will be reached at about 0.1 + (5-2)/6 = 0.6 V. Below -1.4 Va, Vc will also remain at 0 V.

    upload_2017-6-3_2-27-6.png
     
  7. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,662
    1,889
    Sep 5, 2009
    outstanding answer EED, but in future, please take note of what section you are posting in
    this is a homework section so we avoid giving all the answers, rather we work with the OP to give hints on the way to get to the answer themselves :)

    so pose questions back to the OP that get them thinking about what they are trying to do ....


    cheers
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  8. Electrical Engineer David

    Electrical Engineer David

    11
    1
    May 29, 2017
    n
    What is an OP?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 3, 2017
  9. bushtech

    bushtech

    996
    151
    Sep 13, 2016
    Original poster
     
    davenn likes this.
  10. Electrical Engineer David

    Electrical Engineer David

    11
    1
    May 29, 2017
    sorry. im new
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    Please go to the list of forums and then select the Homework forum. Click on the first post.

    or just go here.

    I understand that you may be looking at posts that are new rather than going in via the list of forums and browsing the posts. As such you may not be aware of the rules of the homework section.
     
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