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voltage multipliers?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by lotec, May 16, 2013.

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  1. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    I was wondering if there are voltage multipliers that can be driven by DC input. Do the ones driven by AC need to have every second cap pre-charged first. I know that electrolytics can explode. Is there a circuit to charge caps in parallel then discharge in series without switching them with transistors.
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
  3. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    thank you for that. It was worth a shot. I'll probably rig up an oscillator soon. At the moment all I have is a variable frequency astable. From what Ive read I dont think that, will be of much use for this. Thanks again
    Wil.
     
  4. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Why not use that? You can fix the frequency and connect the output to a voltage multiplier or to a transformer. Add a capacitor in series to the multivibrator's output to block the C component of the waveform from reaching the transformer.
     
  5. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    Thanks for your patients Mr Kapp. Yes use a transformer. I did have an ulterior motive for not wanting to use a transformer on this one. C component of a waveform, Im not familiar with this term but it sounds interesting. I tried searching for C component of a waveform but I didn't get a decent hit. If this topic is to extensive for you to conveniently explain, could you recommend a key word search for search engine. Thanks again.
    Wil
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    C component is a typing error, It should be DC, i.e.the alternating current should be passed by the capacitor and the direct component should be blocked.

    Harald has given several places to look up.
    For low voltages, there are chips which charge capacitors in parallel and then discharge them in series. For high voltages the Cockcroft Walton multiplier can be used.
     
  7. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    Thanks Duke, That makes sense. There are these types of motors that use trigger coils to activate the main drive coil. The trigger coil gives a unidirectional pulse. One time I had problems with this setup oscillating out of control so I tried driving the transistor through a cap. It didn't cure the problem, but what I observed was once the cap was full it stopped allowing the energy through to the transistor. And needed to be discharged. Would driving a transformer through a cap using pulsed DC create the same situation without a reversal of polarity to charge the cap the opposite way.?
     
  8. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    Hi Harold, I was familiar with most of the circuits you mentioned, except the capacitive
    charge pump. This looks like it could be the circuit for me this time, I am looking into it.
    . Cheers Wil
     
  9. lotec

    lotec

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    Apr 15, 2013
    If the cap did need to be discharged every cycle depending on its size perhaps that energy could be recycled for the sake of efficiency.
     
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