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voltage from ignition coil

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Joja, Jan 5, 2007.

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  1. Joja

    Joja Guest

    Is it possible to "save" the voltage output from ignition coil on some high
    voltage capacitor bank?
    The output is between 10-15 KV.

    So, basicly my question would be:
    - How to save this i.c. high voltage output on capacitor bank and what
    design should i use.

    I can connect 15... 1KV capacitors, but i dont think that just this, would
    do the trick...
     
  2. Guest

    You do understand this can kill you?
    You can store quite a large charge in the garden varierty disk
    capacitors but it will not be the whole 15kv. It can burn a hole in
    your hand tho. When you start ganging these things together you can
    get up into the "stick you hand in the TV" category.
     
  3. noName

    noName Guest

     
  4. noName

    noName Guest

    You do understand this can kill you?
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Dont worry :). Its good isolation and am taking big care in security part.
    Basicly i have two options.
    To convert this high voltage to higher current and then to pass it to
    capacitor bank
    or
    to pass it directly to capacitor bank.

    ******************************************************
    Problem:
    If i use first approach i dont know how to use such high voltage on
    transformer.

    Question:
    What is the "real / tested" current on such voltage.
     
  5. You would need an isolation diode (or series of diodes) with a total
    that is what you need.

    Simple example:
    http://www.electricstuff.co.uk/marxgen.htm
    --
    Joe Leikhim K4SAT
    "The RFI-EMI-GUY"©

    "Treason doth never prosper: what's the reason?
    For if it prosper, none dare call it treason."

    "Follow The Money" ;-P
     
  6. John Gilmer

    John Gilmer Guest

    If you plan on "saving" the charge you can, believe it or not, pick up some
    voltage from your TV screen.

    If you "ground" your screen when the set if off (by placing your hand on the
    screen) and the turn the set on it will acquire a charge. You can draw
    that charge off with time foil with a conductive lead to your capacitor
    bank.

    Repeated cycles of "off", "discharge", "on" will permit you to charge your
    capacitor bank to the fringes of 20 kV.

    As far as an ignition coil (automobile type) is concerned, I don't think it
    has the "amps" to kill you.
     
  7. Don Kelly

    Don Kelly Guest

    First thing check your insurance policy as you apparently have no idea of
    what you are doing.

    Suppose you can charge a 1 microfarad capacitor to 15KV (if you can find a
    15KV 1 microfarad capacitor or equivalent) and have a HV diode to prevent
    discharge back through the coil between pulses - then you will have a bit
    less than 120 watt-seconds of energy stored, even if you run it all day.
    What's the point of all the effort for such little outcome?

    Don't play with dangerous toys that you don't understand. It isn't worth it.

    Don Kelly
    remove the X to answer
    ----------------------------
     
  8. Don Kelly

    Don Kelly Guest

    added comment
    The ignition coil can hurt you, the capacitor discharge can kill you.
     
  9. noName

    noName Guest

    The main thing that i need is to find a way to "save" this HV for future
    use.
    I not making sparks or something like this.

    Calculations:
    Im passing 200v DC ( from 50uF capacitor ) to ignition coil and you can see
    the spark on the spark gap.
    I dont know what is the voltage output of the i.c. but i guess it's around
    10-15KV.

    Goal, exp. and conclusion:
    Im trying to find some way to use/save this HV coil output so i can convert
    this high voltage to high current.
    Of course this is the tricky part becuse... i can not use ( as far as i
    know ) standard converters to produce high current, regarding to such HV.
    This is the part where i need your help.

    So:
    1.) Saving the HV from the coil
    2.) converting to high current
     
  10. I suspect that there is a natural reluctance, by many of the posters
    here, to give you any help towards you killing yourself or other(s).
    Quite frankly, if you don't have the knowledge how to generate and store
    extremely high voltages, you are very unlikely to have the knowledge on
    how to handle such voltages safely. A single mistake can easily be
    fatal. Even if not fatal, high voltage burns are very painful and can be
    very slow to heal. They can also require extensive and very expensive
    plastic surgery.

    It might help if you define what you mean by "high current". eg, a
    single pulse with a 20nSec rise time, a duration of 1uSec, a 100nSec
    fall time and a peak value of 10kA. eg a constant current of 10kA for 10
    seconds with rise and fall times less than 1mSec.

    It might also help if you define what the load is going to be.
     
  11. Dead right.

    As a teenager, I played around with ignition coils, rectifiers
    and home-made HV (and rather high capacity) capacitors, and
    produced >2" really meaty sparks (until my capacitors died).
    But I'm extremely reluctant to go into details of how to do
    this if I'm not supervising the experiment, as it's well
    lethal if you screw up.

    If it's the same person who was asking a few weeks ago, he
    doesn't seem to have taken any notice of the advice I did
    give him back then anyway.
     
  12. Guest

    | In article <eno8km$4cs$>,
    |> I suspect that there is a natural reluctance, by many of the posters
    |> here, to give you any help towards you killing yourself or other(s).
    |
    | Dead right.
    |
    | As a teenager, I played around with ignition coils, rectifiers
    | and home-made HV (and rather high capacity) capacitors, and
    | produced >2" really meaty sparks (until my capacitors died).
    | But I'm extremely reluctant to go into details of how to do
    | this if I'm not supervising the experiment, as it's well
    | lethal if you screw up.
    |
    | If it's the same person who was asking a few weeks ago, he
    | doesn't seem to have taken any notice of the advice I did
    | give him back then anyway.

    Back in the late 1960's I had one of those Heathkit experimenter boards,
    about the middle of the line. It operated on 4 C cell batteries for a
    6 volt DC level. After getting board with some of the various circuits
    in the manual, I played around with a few of my own. Among them was a
    couple circuits to cause the relay to oscillate. One of them operated
    in the mode that closed the N.O. contact to short the coil, which in turn
    let the contact open again. The other put the coil in series with the
    N.C. contact. From this latter one I notice a spark coming from the
    contact. I played around with that one for a while until I happened to
    touch a couple contacts on the thing and go a nasty shock. That coil
    being opened was sure letting our quite a high voltage. I never did
    measure it, but it felt like more than 120 volts.
     
  13. Ben Miller

    Ben Miller Guest

    -

    I will reinforce what others have told you. You are playing with things that
    can kill you, and are way over your head as far as your knowledge goes.
    Producing and storing high voltage requires specialized knowledge and safety
    procedures, which I am pretty sure you don't have any idea about. Please
    don't play with this further until you have received some formal training.

    Ben Miller

    -
    Benjamin D. Miller, PE
    B. MILLER ENGINEERING
    www.bmillerengineering.com
     
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