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voltage and current amplifier

Discussion in 'Electronics Homework Help' started by bhuvanesh, Mar 10, 2015.

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  1. bhuvanesh

    bhuvanesh

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    Aug 29, 2013
    voltage amplifier does voltage amplification
    current amplifier does current amplification

    Is there something like power amplifier or power amplifier is just same as current amplifier?
     
  2. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Sure, there are amplifiers that are specifically called "power amplifiers" because they accept a "low power" signal input and produce a "high power" signal output. In the RF field, where input impedance is commonly the same as output impedance, the power amplifier amplification factor, or gain, is typically expressed in decibels and the output power is specified in watts. This allows you to determine the amount of input power required to drive the RF power amplifier to its rated output power. For example, my KXPA-100 amateur radio linear amplifier produces 100 watts output into fifty ohm load impedance. It requires about 5 watts of drive power, also into fifty ohm load impedance. Therefore the power gain is 10 log (100/5) = 13 dB.
     
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  3. bhuvanesh

    bhuvanesh

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    Aug 29, 2013
    RF amplifier is one that amplify the received low power radio frequency signal to high power signal ,isn't it ?
    In mic the audio signal is power amplified to drive loudspeaker,like could you say why rf amplifier amplify rf signals?
    i just want to know the purpose of the amplification
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    yes, for a transmitter or a receiver

    you have already answered your own question
     
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  5. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Low power and high power are relative attributes of any signal. A high power RF signal for a broadcast radio or television station might be tens or hundreds of kilowatts. However, this would be considered a low power signal for a ground-penetrating or missile tracking radar system whose power output is often measured in megawatts.

    The purpose of amplification is to increase a lower power signal to a higher power level, as in your microphone > power amplifier > speaker example. Similar reasons apply to RF signals. For example, an RF signal received on an antenna might have less than a microwatt of power. An RF amplifier can make this signal large enough to perform some useful function as part of a radio receiver. For an RF transmitter, it is usually easier to generate and apply modulation to RF signals at lower power levels than at the power level applied to the transmitting antenna. It is for this purpose that linear RF amplifiers are made.

    Back in "the good old days" of amateur radio, most radiotelephone communication used amplitude modulation (AM). In the absence of a linear RF amplifier, the audio modulation was applied at 50% of the power level of the RF carrier by inserting an audo power transformer in series with the plate power supply to the "final" amplifier operating as a Class C RF amplifier, to obtain 100% modulation, and hence the largest available signal at the receiver. Thus an amateur radio operator desiring to transmit a "full gallon" or 1000 watts of power needed a 500 watt audio power amplifier to modulate the power input to their 1 kW "final" RF amplifier. Some hams did build or buy lower power AM transmitters and add a linear RF amplifier to their rig, but that was not cheap either.

    Most broadcast AM stations "bit the bullet" and built audio modulation amplifiers with power output equal to half of their transmitter carrier power. The vacuum tubes used by clear-channel AM radio station WLW (located in the USA near Cincinnati, Ohio) transmitted (at one time) a carrier power of 500,000 watts. The vacuum tubes were externally water-cooled from a recirculating water pond located outside the station. Today, WLW transmits AM with "only" 70,000 watt carrier.
     
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  6. bhuvanesh

    bhuvanesh

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    Aug 29, 2013
    okay
    ASSUME:if suppose a speaker having low impedance ,then power amplifier want to amplifies the current to drive the speaker
    ASSUME:if suppose a speaker having high impedance ,then power amplifier want to amplifies the voltage to drive the speaker
    am i right?
     
  7. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    No, you are not right.
     
  8. Laplace

    Laplace

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    Apr 4, 2010
    Since the topic of this question is 'audio power amplifiers' one needs to consider whether the connected speakers are designed to operate with a voltage input or current input. For instance, if the speakers (whether high impedance or low impedance) are designed to be voltage driven, then they might not sound right if driven by a current signal. If a high power amplifier is intended to drive a low impedance speaker of similar power, the current flow could be quite hefty. But do not make the mistake that a high current output means it was the current that was amplified.
     
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