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Viewing circuits in mono-spaced-font

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Ivan Vegvary, Jan 2, 2013.

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  1. Ivan Vegvary

    Ivan Vegvary Guest

    Circuits are posted here (much appreciated) suggesting the use of mono-spaced-font for viewing. I've tried cut/paste into OpenOffice and then using a mono-font. Doesn't seem to work. Is there a way to use mono-font in Google Chrome?

    Suggestions appreciated.
    Ivan Vegvary
     
  2. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    There are lots of great programs. One is PSPAD, which is a
    very simple, uncomplicated program editor. And free. But you
    can use NotePad, if you are using Windows. Select all the
    text and go to the Format edit menu and select Font... under
    that. Then select the Courier New font.

    In the olden days, fixed spaced fonts (on type balls, for
    example) included only three: Courier, Letter Gothic, and
    Prestige Elite. These days on PC computers you can add
    Courier New, Lucida Console, FixedSys, and probably anything
    with "mono" in its name.

    For google chrome, see this page to start:

    http://support.google.com/chrome/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=95416

    It covers everything you can do with Chrome, I think.

    Jon
     
  3. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    However, I think you will have to "mess up" all your web
    pages to get there with Chrome, by forcing the default to be
    fixed (mono) spaced fonts.

    Here is an example to try. It's a degenerative amp with a
    bootstrap that I'd designed and tried out some years ago:

    Vcc
    |
    |
    | Vcc Vcc
    | | |
    --- | |
    - V1 | |
    --- 9 \ \
    - / R3 / R2
    | \ 47k \ 22k
    | / /
    | | |
    | | |
    | | +---------> Vout
    gnd C1 | |
    || 10u | |
    ,------||--------------------------, |
    | || | | |
    | | R6 | |/c Q1
    | +---------/\/\----+----| 2N2222
    | | 150k |>e
    | | |
    | | C3 |
    | | || .033u +---------,
    | +--------------||--------+ |
    --- | || | |
    - V2 \ \ \
    --- 5kHz / R4 / R1 / R5
    - .02V p-p \ 10k \ 4.7k \ 1.2k
    | / / /
    | | | |
    | | | |
    gnd | | --- C2
    | | --- 2.2u
    | | |
    gnd gnd |
    gnd

    If you get your fonts right, it should look okay to you.

    Jon
     
  4. Daniel Pitts

    Daniel Pitts Guest

    I use Thunderbird to access newsgroups, and that renders just fine for me.
     
  5. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    Just as a note, that ASCII diagram didn't exist until a
    little over an hour ago. I produced it using a program I have
    that accepts LTspice .ASC files and generates ASCII from
    them. So I just popped it in, copied the output into the
    paste buffer, and pasted it into the post text and sent it.

    Jon
     
  6. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    it's real easy, there's three steps.

    1: use the old google groups

    when you find a diagram to read.

    2: click more options
    3: click view original


    The new google groups has no eqivalent and there appers to be no place
    to post complaints about it. If this continues by the next version it
    will be unusable eye-candy. I suggest you look for an alternative.
     
  7. Mark Zenier

    Mark Zenier Guest

    Try adjusting the tab character's column alignment to match what the
    circuits's creator used. Computer geeks and business use different
    "standards".

    ASCII circuits should use strings of blanks instead of tabs, but I
    suspect those get messed with when posting or reading through websites
    or by the browsers' text editing software.

    Mark Zenier
    Googleproofaddress(account:mzenier provider:eskimo domain:com)
     
  8. Jonathan, I would like to get a copy of that program. Can you post a link
    or something?
     
  9. Tolstoy

    Tolstoy Guest

    I would like to use that program. Do you have a link you could post?
     
  10. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    I need to update it for "modern" Windows 7, 64-bit. I
    currently run it under a WinXP VM under Windows 7, because I
    wrote it for a 16-bit C compiler (Microsoft VC++ 1.52c, the
    last 16-bit C compiler they ever made available to the
    public.)

    If you are willing to run it under a 32-bit O/S and don't
    mind a DOS box execution environment (and the use of DIR/X in
    order to get the 8.3 filename required as its input), then
    sure. I could send it along. You can even extend or modify
    its ASCII symbol library, too, with NOTEPAD. It's not hard.

    Let me know if all that is okay. If so, I'll provide a link.

    Jon
     
  11. Tolstoy

    Tolstoy Guest

    Yes, I'd like to try it. I have a 32-bit computer with WinXP.
     
  12. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    http://www.infinitefactors.org/misc/asc32.zip

    There is another version at:

    http://www.infinitefactors.org/misc/asc16.zip

    The first one I just recompiled under Visual Studio 2012
    Professional in Release mode. This was under Win7 64-bit. I
    then tested this console32 application under a WinXP VM and
    it seems to work and it seems to accept long file names, as
    well (quoted, if they have spaces in them, of course.)

    The second one is the old version compiled under 1.52c, which
    is the last 16-bit C compiler that Microsoft made. It does
    not accept long file names. So you need to use DIR/X first to
    see the short names that it will accept (8.3).

    In either case, make certain that ASC.EXE and ASC.SYM are in
    the same directory. Easiest would be to just put both of them
    into the LTspice directory where you keep the .ASC files.

    Hopefully, you will find them useful. There is much more
    work to be done. I need to expand the ASC.SYM file. But it is
    NOTEPAD editable and you can edit it if you want to add more
    ASCII equivalents (or modify the existing ones.)

    I have already started a project that will automatically read
    up the symbol files of LTspice and, through a somewhat
    complex algorithm, "figure out" ASCII characters to use in
    drawing symbols. I think I can get close enough to what a
    human would do that it will be acceptable. The idea would
    then be to allow the ASC.SYM file to override the automatic
    generation from symbol graphic files, but if the ASC.SYM file
    doesn't include an override, then the automatic process would
    take over and give it a reasonable shot.

    Jon
     
  13. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    http://www.infinitefactors.org/misc/asc32.zip

    There is another version at:

    http://www.infinitefactors.org/misc/asc16.zip

    The first one I just recompiled under Visual Studio 2012
    Professional in Release mode. This was under Win7 64-bit. I
    then tested this console32 application under a WinXP VM and
    it seems to work and it seems to accept long file names, as
    well (quoted, if they have spaces in them, of course.)

    The second one is the old version compiled under 1.52c, which
    is the last 16-bit C compiler that Microsoft made. It does
    not accept long file names. So you need to use DIR/X first to
    see the short names that it will accept (8.3).

    In either case, make certain that ASC.EXE and ASC.SYM are in
    the same directory. Easiest would be to just put both of them
    into the LTspice directory where you keep the .ASC files.

    Hopefully, you will find them useful. There is much more
    work to be done. I need to expand the ASC.SYM file. But it is
    NOTEPAD editable and you can edit it if you want to add more
    ASCII equivalents (or modify the existing ones.)

    I have already started a project that will automatically read
    up the symbol files of LTspice and, through a somewhat
    complex algorithm, "figure out" ASCII characters to use in
    drawing symbols. I think I can get close enough to what a
    human would do that it will be acceptable. The idea would
    then be to allow the ASC.SYM file to override the automatic
    generation from symbol graphic files, but if the ASC.SYM file
    doesn't include an override, then the automatic process would
    take over and give it a reasonable shot.

    Jon
     
  14. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    the ms-dos version runs just fine under linux dosemu (and slightly
    slower under wine) wine. the PE32 version also works under wine.

    here's a patch to make it compile and work the same under linux.
    (it should probably work slightly differently under linux.)

    I have tried to break as few rules as possible without massive rewrites.
    Also I haven't implemented any of the clipboard stuff, so that stuff
    is all jut stubs.


    $ diff ASC.C ASC.c
    308c308,312
    <
    ---
    806,809c855,858
    < *xmin= __min( __min( *xmin, x1 ), x2 );
    < *xmax= __max( __max( *xmax, x1 ), x2 );
    < *ymin= __min( __min( *ymin, y1 ), y2 );
    < *ymax= __max( __max( *ymax, y1 ), y2 );
    ---
    824,827c873,876
    < *xmin= __min( *xmin, x );
    < *xmax= __max( *xmax, x );
    < *ymin= __min( *ymin, y );
    < *ymax= __max( *ymax, y );
    ---
    858,861c907,910
    < *xmin= __min( *xmin, x );
    < *xmax= __max( *xmax, x );
    < *ymin= __min( *ymin, y );
    < *ymax= __max( *ymax, y );
    ---
    880,883c929,932
    < *xmin= __min( *xmin, x );
    < *xmax= __max( *xmax, x );
    < *ymin= __min( *ymin, y );
    < *ymax= __max( *ymax, y );
    ---
    900,903c949,952
    < *xmin= __min( __min( *xmin, ulx ), lrx );
    < *xmax= __max( __max( *xmax, ulx ), lrx );
    < *ymin= __min( __min( *ymin, uly ), lry );
    < *ymax= __max( __max( *ymax, uly ), lry );
    ---
     
  15. Jon Kirwan

    Jon Kirwan Guest

    I'll look it over, thanks.

    Jon
     
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