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VCR eat's tapes

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Oct 10, 2006.

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  1. Guest

    It eats tapes only sometimes, usually when I stop it. Problem is, that
    it doesn't have a rubber idler or any belts. so where should I be
    looking.

    I'd replace it, but I can't buy one with a digital tuner until next
    year and I'd hate to buy a new one only to throw it away early next
    year.
     
  2. http://freecycle.org/

    or

    http://www.craigslist.org/

    --
     
  3. Guest

    I'm not interested in giving away or selling a defective VCR. I want
    to fix this one.
     
  4. Getting a free one is easier but if you insist:

    http://www.fixer.com/
     
  5. b

    b Guest

    ha escrito:
    please post the make and model number if you expect useful repair tips.
    there are thousands of vcrs out there , each one with different chassis
    design!

    usually, if there is no belt and the unit loops the tape on eject ,
    then the mode switch needs cleaning or replacing or in the case of many
    sonys, the half load arm is stiff due to old grease.

    anyway, get back to us with the info and we'll take it from there.
    regards, B.
     
  6. Guest

    It's a JVC HR-S3500U.
    S-VHS VCR (also does the VHS-ET)
     
  7. Guest

    Not if you have to have JVC VHS-ET and SVHS
     
  8. Guest

    I've only repaired older VCR's that had idler tire, belt, or those end
    of tape sensor problems before (I.E. - easy stuff). I'm not familiar
    with the mode switch. Will research.
     
  9. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Are the belts ok?
     
  10. Jeff, WB8NHV

    Jeff, WB8NHV Guest


    A VCR with no idler or belts almost certainly has cheap plastic parts
    (gears, etc.) in the drive mechanism, as do most VCRs made today. The
    trend is going heavily towards completely gear-driven systems,
    eliminating belts and idlers almost entirely; the only problem is, this
    type of VCR is or can be extremely noisy--I have a Panasonic VCR which
    is very noisy when in rewind, but that's the nature of the system. I
    simply use an external rewinder, rather than the VCR's rewind function.
    Saves a lot of wear and tear on the VCR's drive mechanism as well.

    Your VCR may not be worth repairing unless it is still under
    warranty, in which case, of course, I'd go ahead and have it fixed.
    But if it's a year or two old or more and out of warranty, I would just
    get rid of it and get a new one.

    If you get a VCR with an ATSC (digital) tuner next year, you won't
    have to discard it early next year or for quite some time. If you have
    digital cable you have nothing to worry about as far as compatibility
    issues are concerned; your ATSC-equipped VCR will work with the system.
    The only drawback is that if you have an analog TV, you won't see the
    programs in HD. I have digital cable (with a converter box) and an
    analog TV and VCR, and they work just fine together. Yours should as
    well; in fact, with a VCR having a digital tuner, as will be required
    of all TVs/VCRs next year, you will be able to eliminate your cable box
    as well, if you are using one at this time.

    Kind regards,

    Jeff, WB8NHV (email addy not shown to deter spammers)
    Fairport Harbor, Ohio USA
     
  11. Guest

    Are the belts ok?

    It doesn't have any belts.
     
  12. Guest

    Anyone have a link to picture of what this mode switch most likely
    looks like? I've never done one before and it might be helpful if I
    knew exactly what to look for and if I have to desolder it before
    cleaning, etc.
     
  13. b

    b Guest


    http://www.mainelectronics.com/modeswch.htm
    here you are.

    note they come in all shapec and sizes.
    -B.
     
  14. Franc Zabkar

    Franc Zabkar Guest

    If your VCR chews tapes when the cassette is ejected, then it could be
    that the brake pads need replacing. What normally happens is that the
    brakes are applied after the tape is retracted into the cassette
    housing. If the brakes slip, then some slack remains outside the
    housing and the cassette flap closes over it on the way out.

    - Franc Zabkar
     
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