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UV lamp question for ozone generation...

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by KILOWATT, Feb 10, 2005.

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  1. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    Hi everyones...thanks to read. Please check the following link:
    http://cgi.ebay.ca/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3872692720&fromMakeTrack=t
    rue
    With a proper enclosure, circulating fan, a timer circuit, and the item
    descibed there, do you think that i would have all the components to make an
    inexpensive but efficient Ozone generator? TIA

    --
    Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
    Montréal Québec
    PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
    i'm a "pure" french canadian! :)
    Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
    (If replying also by e-mail, remove
    "no spam" from the adress.)
     
  2. Lord Garth

    Lord Garth Guest


    Alain, you can do as well with any fluorescent lamp and a germicidal tube to
    match.
    I would not pay over $10 for this including shipping.

    I have to vent my UV EPROM eraser due to the ozone it produces. Heed the
    warnings
    to protect your eyes...I lightly 'sunburned' my hand with a 30 second
    exposure.
     
  3. Guest

    I couldnt get your ebay page to open so Im sure exactly what you are
    wanting to do but......

    You can make an inexpensive ozone generator out of a used oil burner
    ignition transformer and a wad of steel wool or tin foil. Just take the
    two high voltage leads from the transformer output and jam them into a
    wad of steel wool or crampled up tinfoil. You will generate massive
    amounts of ozone. If you can find a heating and cooling place in your
    area they will sometimes give you old transformers off of furnaces they
    have replaced..just got to catch them before they send the furnace to
    the scrap yard.

    Older neon sign transformers will do the same thing...but are usually
    harder to get around here than old oil burner transformers.
     
  4. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    LOL... an ignition xformer? What a compact project that would be! :)
    Shure..what a nice lighting show i would get! ;-)



    I couldnt get your ebay page to open so Im sure exactly what you are
    wanting to do but......

    You can make an inexpensive ozone generator out of a used oil burner
    ignition transformer and a wad of steel wool or tin foil. Just take the
    two high voltage leads from the transformer output and jam them into a
    wad of steel wool or crampled up tinfoil. You will generate massive
    amounts of ozone. If you can find a heating and cooling place in your
    area they will sometimes give you old transformers off of furnaces they
    have replaced..just got to catch them before they send the furnace to
    the scrap yard.

    Older neon sign transformers will do the same thing...but are usually
    harder to get around here than old oil burner transformers.
     
  5. Mark Jones

    Mark Jones Guest

    Ignition xfrmr's will produce ozone as long as only a partial plasma channel is
    maintained. I have created ozone by placing the electrodes on a rock, where the
    surface readily ionozes a light blue from partial conduction. But as soon as the
    rock heats up enough to initiate full conduction, the rock's done for.

    That said, ozone is not as great as everyone seems to think it is, probably
    thanks to the news media. Ozone is a strong oxidizer since it's tertiary oxygen
    molecule has a very weak bond. Anything O3 comes into contact with is oxidized -
    including plastics (rubberbands turn into chunks of hard, brittle rubber),
    metals (exposed metals "rust" readily in the presence of O3), and at
    ground-level overall it is a major pollution contributor. The stuff is only good
    for two things: blocking harmful UV in the upper atmosphere (where it belongs
    and all the skin cancer patients wish there were more of) and cleaning large
    volumes of open air (what we get from thunderstorms naturally.)
     
  6. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    Another use for ozone: Water purification, instead of chlorine.
    Don't know the pros and cons of this, but a local spring water
    company used it to purify their water. I think they claimed it
    left no or less harmful products in the water than chlorine.

    Best regards,


    Bob Masta
    dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
     
  7. I read in sci.electronics.design that Bob Masta <>
    Less harmful products, and the water tastes better. But ozone treatment
    is more costly than chlorine. You also get, of course, the idiots who
    cite the limits for *airborne* ozone to show that it's 'far more toxic'
    than chlorine.
     
  8. Fred Abse

    Fred Abse Guest

    Are there any limits for airborne chlorine? I know which of chlorine or
    ozone I'd rather breathe traces of :)

    Ozone decomposes, too.
     
  9. AFAUI, all "spring water" is ozonated so that it won't kill people.
    They don't go out of their way to advertise it on the label. Many
    places use ozone for municipal water purification-- one problem is
    that there is not enough residual ozone in the water to deal with
    bacteria and so on that may enter through the distribution system, so
    you have to have some chlorine. Some years back I was involved with a
    water purification appliance that created (and destroyed) ozone to
    purify water in small batches. It worked fairly well- even helping to
    remove some metals by oxidizing them and removing them with a
    conventional filter.


    Best regards,
    Spehro Pefhany
     
  10. Charles Jean

    Charles Jean Guest

    ---
    Ozone is great for disinfection, but has the drawback of being so
    reactive it doesn't last very long. It won't maintain a residual
    disinfectant concentration in long municipal distribution systems.
    Can also form bromate(bad boy) from any bromide that occurs naturally
    in the source water.
    GRAVITY:

    It's not just a good idea-IT'S THE LAW!
     
  11. Mark Jones

    Mark Jones Guest

    Hmm, I wonder how O3 would do as a regenerator for CuCl etchant...
     
  12. It will certainly oxidize cuprous chloride to cupric chloride, but if it
    decides to go the whole nine nanometres and make copper ozonide, RUN FOR
    YOUR LIFE! (;-)
     
  13. xray

    xray Guest

    I'm no chemist. What are its characteristics? Highly toxic? Unstable?
     
  14. I read in sci.electronics.design that xray <>
    Yes, prone to 'autonomous energetic disassembly'. (;-)

    It's no doubt highly toxic as well, but you'd never get to find out.
     
  15. peterken

    peterken Guest

    There's a much simpler way :
    - Use any old high voltage generator (strip a TV set or something), make
    sure a voltage of minimum 2kV can be attained
    - connect ground wire to a 'U' shaped metal bar with inside size of say 1/2"
    - fix a very thin wire (preferrable wolfram, 0.001" or smaller) inside the
    U-shape at equal distance from any side
    (take care for the insulators at the opposite ends, so no flashing can
    occur)
    - connect this wire to the hot side of the transformer
    - turn up the voltage until the wire starts glowing in the dark, a 'sizzing'
    sound will be heard
    ==> ozon as much as you like

    Beware, ozon is rather agressive !!
     
  16. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    I've never heard of CuCl as an etchant, but for standard ferric
    chloride etchant I've heard of people adding HCl to regenerate it.
    I've never tried that, since I wasn't sure how to tell how much to
    add (without etching test boards, etc). I assume there must be
    an optimum pH involved.

    However, there is definitely an optimum concentration for
    ferric chloride itself. It often comes too concentrated
    as shipped, and hardly etches at all until you dilute it
    down to 1.30 specific gravity. Curiously, as the etchant
    gets exhausted and action slows down, adding water will
    speed it back up again and extend its life. At the lab
    where I used to work, they used to do this a couple of
    times before declaring it exhausted. After the initial
    1.30 adjustement of the new batch, the extra rejuvenations
    were done "by eye", so I can't tell you what SG they
    brought it back to. I also don't know how much of the
    slow-down might have been caused by evaporation in
    the etching tanks and trays, so I don't know if the
    subsequent water additions were just correcting for
    evaporation, or actual chemical exhaustion.

    But whatever, ferric chloride is pretty mysterious stuff.
    We were all amazed to find that dilution made it more
    active.

    Best regards,


    Bob Masta
    dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
     
  17. I read in sci.electronics.design that Bob Masta <>
    It's actually cupric chloride, CuCl2. It isn't nearly as well known as
    ferric chloride FeCl3, but it is quite widely used in industry.
     
  18. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    Polarity needs to alternate. I've found that DC voltage is not very
    efficient, as the one coming from flyback xformers. However i think that a
    flyback can still be used if it doesn't include the HV diode.

    --
    Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
    Montréal Québec
    PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
    i'm a "pure" french canadian! :)
    Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
    (If replying also by e-mail, remove
    "no spam" from the adress.)
     
  19. peterken

    peterken Guest

    Correct, a real ac also doesn't 'foul up' the electrodes as much as dc does
    Nevertheless, a positive dc on the wire is most stable but less efficient as
    a negative dc
    The ac combines both with the added advantage of cleanness

    One *might* also use a flyback xformer (without built-in cascade) at it's
    oscillation point, thus needing less input voltage and creating a nice sine
    wave output
    (actually did it more as once, during design of transfert electrodes in a
    electrostatic printer)
     
  20. Fred Abse

    Fred Abse Guest

    I once made some copper acetylide at school.

    Nitrogen triiodide was good, too...

    Amazing what you could get away with back then.
     
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