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Utility to burn in new hard drive?

Discussion in 'Electrical Engineering' started by Joe S, Jul 27, 2006.

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  1. Joe S

    Joe S Guest

    Are there any utilities which can burn-in a new hard drive before I
    start to use it?
     
  2. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    No point in doing that.

    You can use something like HDTach if you want,
    or use smartctl to run the smart test mode forever.
     
  3. kony

    kony Guest


    Run the HDD manufacturers diagnostics, including the full
    read/write surface scan. Same for scandisk, surface
    testing.

    Fill it with data, then copy it off again. Personally I
    never trust a new drive for at least a few weeks, only
    mirrored data goes onto it.

    As for one-system-one-drive type of burn in, not really, at
    most you can again run the manufacturers diagnostics if
    they'll run, and try installing windows/other-OS.
     
  4. If the drive has a jumper labelled SS (Self Seek), this
    will give it a jolly good work through with just the power
    connected. Unfortunately, this has become quite rare on
    disks nowadays, whereas it was once quite standard.
     
  5. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    Virtually all can do that now using smart, invoked with something like smartctl.
     
  6. I would use CX command (random seeks untill stoped) from MHDD

    --
    Alan Kakareka
    Data Recovery Service
    786-253-8286 cell
    http://www.247recovery.com
    --
     
  7. Sjouke Burry

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Scandisk with multiple surface scan??
    (after you format it)
     
  8. DaveW

    DaveW Guest

    You do NOT have to burn in a harddrive.
     
  9. Don Freeman

    Don Freeman Guest

    The theory being that burning it in will reveal faults (that won't show up
    until used a bit) in areas that can then be locked away from use. Or, if a
    significant number, trigger the return of the drive to the vendor.
     
  10. Arno Wagner

    Arno Wagner Guest

    Not really. Infant mortality for HDDs is pretty low these days, so
    burn-in does not help much. Same is generally true for semiconductors.
    It used to be different.

    Hiwever if you really want to burn in, then just put the drive
    under higher load for some time. I used to do this by compiling
    Linux kernels in a loop.

    Arno
     
  11. Matt

    Matt Guest

    True if you don't care whether the drive works.
     
  12. Guest

    Just crank up some memory hog application that handles files bigger
    than your ram and you will thrash the hell out of the drive as it
    pages the data in and out.
    Sound Forge with a big audio file or some video editor springs to
    mind.
     
  13. Ryze Edup

    Ryze Edup Guest

    maybe try an anal burner ?
     
  14. Osiris

    Osiris Guest

    Fill it with data, then copy it off again. Personally I
    I extend the mistrust to the disks entire llifespan...
    It's volatile memory...
    backup procedures, redundancy etc..

    Are there any drives that one could submit to diagnostics ALL the
    time, that transmit "condition data" to the mobo/OS constantly ?
     
  15. Osiris

    Osiris Guest

    Defining "burn in" as compressing a weeks normal operation into an ,
    say, hour ?

    Is it "generally accepted", that a virgin HD will only decease within
    1 hour or after 5 years of operation ?
     
  16. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    Osiris wrote
    Yep, that's what SMART is about.
     
  17. Rod Speed

    Rod Speed Guest

    No they dont.
    Yes, only a small percentage fail soon.
     
  18. All of them. Google SMART.
     
  19. kony

    kony Guest


    While that seems right initially, seldom do I hear of a
    drive arriving DOA or dying immediately (within an hour),
    usually it's within the first 9 months to a year if the
    failure is premature.
     
  20. Jaxx

    Jaxx Guest

    I thought one of the differences between a Maxtor DiamondMax and a
    MaXLine was that the MaXLine had been soak tested for longer?

    In that case, testing a new drive mightbe worthwhile?
     
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