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USB Flash Drive Repair

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by spaceaze, Aug 10, 2007.

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  1. spaceaze

    spaceaze Guest

    Hi folks,

    My 1 GIG SANS USB Flash Drive is not being recognized by my PC. My
    grandson stepped on the drive as it was plugged into the PC and I am
    sure the pins are bent.and pulled off the board. Is there any testing
    equipment that could read the memory or usb parts site where I could
    replace the NAND chip and put it on another board?


    spaceaze
     
  2. Guest

    I picked up a 1 GIG at Fry's last week for $8 after the rebate. Is it
    worth the bother or is this to see if it can be done? Often the
    connector gets damaged and pulls pads / traces off the board. Welcome
    to the throw away society. Or is there material on the drive you
    really need to salvage? For salvage purposes you can temporarily
    'baby' the connections long enough to read 'one more time'.

    GG
     
  3. JANA

    JANA Guest

    The parts used are proprietary. You have to buy a new USB drive. Also, for
    the price that they sell for, it does not pay to service these.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    Hi folks,

    My 1 GIG SANS USB Flash Drive is not being recognized by my PC. My
    grandson stepped on the drive as it was plugged into the PC and I am
    sure the pins are bent.and pulled off the board. Is there any testing
    equipment that could read the memory or usb parts site where I could
    replace the NAND chip and put it on another board?


    spaceaze
     
  4. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    I tried to answer last night, but my newserver wouldn't let me post.
    I'll try again....

    If there is irreplaceable data on the drive, open it up and see where
    the damage is. If it's merely the connections to the integral USB,
    either resolder them, or if the damage is too severe, remove all
    vestiges of the plug from the board. Examine and repair any other
    damage to the board. Then cut off the end of a USB cable, prep the
    wires and solder them to the pads where the original plug was attached.

    Get your data off. Throw the whole mess away. Back up more often.

    This is MUCH easier than trying to transplant the memory. Take care to
    use standard anti-static precautions: grounded iron, grounded board,
    grounded 'you'.

    jak
     
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