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Unusual Touchscreen Monitor Power Supply - Never saw before

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by lvslezak, Jul 20, 2020.

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  1. lvslezak

    lvslezak

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    0
    Jul 20, 2020
    I made the mistake of buying a touchscreen all-in-one computer without a power cord, because I assumed that I could easily find a replacement cord. Well, 2 weeks later, I am still out of luck. I did numerous Google searches, called several electrical/computer supply businesses, and even called the manufacturer (ELO). ELO customer service told me that this model was discontinued in 2006, and the supplier of the cord no longer supplies them. I don't know much about electrical power supplies, but I could tell from the touchscreen that it required some sort of 8-pin power cord, and was listed at 12V 12.5A . I thought that maybe I could substitute a similar 8 pin, 12v 12.5a cord, so I ordered one that was 12V 15A 180W 8Pin RXVT7 AC Adapter. Well, it plugged in fine, but the yellow light on the box attached to the power cord went out as soon as I plugged it into the back of the computer.
    I'm starting to feel like I wasted over $150 on this computer, because I cannot find a power cord. Does this make sense that there is not a single option to get this machine powered up? Is it possible to somehow change the power supply on the unit, or find some sort of adapter that would
    work? Any good advice on what can be done to make it operational will be greatly appreciated. As can be seen from the attached images, the model number of it is E759601. Thanks.

    touchscreen3.jpg touchscreen2.jpg touchscreen.jpg touchscreen 4.jpg
     
  2. bertus

    bertus Moderator

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    Nov 8, 2019
  3. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Jul 7, 2015
    Isn't the power input socket that big black thing on the right? I would have guessed the 8-pin socket on the left is a power output to feed external peripherals.
     
  4. dave9

    dave9

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    Mar 5, 2017
    Can you find a picture of the original power cord, and is it just a cord or an AC/DC adapter brick on a cord?
    I wonder the same as Alec_t, whether the AC input socket is on the right in the picture (or elsewhere not pictured) and it has is own internal AC/DC PSU. If you take the cover off the back so we can see more, it might tell us how it's designed for power.

    If you are 100% sure that the 8 pin is for main 12V INPUT power, then use a multimeter to check for resistance between each pin, and a chassis ground, like any of those connector shells on the I/O plate pictured. Any that have near zero resistance are a ground, and any that aren't, are the 12V input. I mean it is possible that the PSU you tried, simply had the pins in the wrong locations if it really does use an external brick 12V input on that 8 pin connector.

    You might just need to pull the pins out of the PSU and swap them to the correct positions. I can only assume that your PSU is known good/working.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2020
  5. Alec_t

    Alec_t

    2,844
    760
    Jul 7, 2015
    My guess was wrong. The user manual confirms the 8-pin socket is power input :-
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

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    May 12, 2015
    Three things may have happened here.
    1. The computer failed and damaged the original PSU. The owner couldn’t get a replacement PSU so gave it to a thrift store not knowing the computer died.

    2. Your dell replacement PSU worked but the computer damaged it.

    3. The Dell replacement PSU pin configuration is completely different and damaged the computer.

    These power supplies usually work fine after a short circuit has been remedied. Plug it in without the computer connected and see if it still works.
    The Dell 8 pin configuration can be found here.
    You really need a pinout of the original PSU before connecting ‘willy nilly’ any old unit.
    Now, you may be lucky if you open the computer and find voltages printed on the circuit board by the power connector.

    Martin
     
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