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Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Wirewolf, Nov 3, 2016.

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  1. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Can anyone tell me what this is. It's in an electric wall heater that is broken and I thought I'd try and fix it. Couldn't see anything obvious but there is no continuity across this component. I'll probably struggle to remove it anyway but curious to know what it is component from wall heater.jpg

    Thanks
     
  2. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    It is a thermal fuse :) you can check it for continuity with a Multimeter.
     
    Arouse1973 and davenn like this.
  3. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Thank you Constantine. There is no continuity. Suppose that means it needs to be replaced - If that's possible.
     
  4. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    You betcha, if you want your heater to work again.
    The problem is the ring-tongue lug terminals on the thermal fuse are riveted to the connection.
    Can you get somebody who knows what they're doing to replace it for you?
    You'll need to read your thermal fuse markings to get the correct replacement, then correctly crimp
    replacement ring-tongue lugs to the thermal fuse leads, then drill out the rivets, and replace the rivets, or
    use good nut & bolt fasteners to re-install the replacement.
    You need somebody who knows what they're doing so that the heater element doesn't get damaged during
    the replacement process.
     
    HellasTechn and bushtech like this.
  5. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Thanks shrtrnd, problem is there are no written makings on it. Does the colour if it mean anything (similar to the colours on resistors)? Or is it possible to calculate from the heater rating (2kW and 240V)
     
  6. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    Some of the mass-production brands use a colored goop to designate the temperature range.
    You have the flat end with one lead, and the pointed end with another lead.
    The pointed end may have a particular color goop, isolating the lead at that end from the case.
    I'm about ready to take a few days off, and won't be back on.
    If you have a color, look it up on the internet (thermal fuse information), to find the temperature range of
    the one you need to replace.
    If you have trouble, hopefully someone here will get back to you.
    In your case, if you have little to no hands-on electronics experience, and don't know anyone that can help you:
    I suggest when you have the replacement, cut the bad thermal fuse off AT the fuse itself so you still have the leads
    that are riveted to your heating element, Get an all-metal crimp or butt-splice, and crimp the leads of the new
    replacement thermal fuse to the existing leads that are already riveted in place.
    Don't screw around with that. You need a good, metal, contact to those leads. No plastics or glue. They're
    going to get hot, and you need just bare metal for this repair.
    If you have problems, ask here, and someone will probably try to help you (before I get back).
    If done correctly, this should be a good repair to get you back in business.
    Thermal fuses are usually the problem, and not the heating element itself.
    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2016
    HellasTechn likes this.
  7. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    That is exactly the way to do it. Good practice.
     
  8. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    You are welcomed friend !
     
  9. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Thanks for the help but I'm finding it impossible to identify the rating of the thermal fuse. The heater is only £25 to replace but I hate being part of the throw away society-sending more stuff to landfill. It's a shame these parts aren't more easily identifiable so people with the will and a bit of know how can fix them. Ive posted as good a photo as i can take just in case anyone knows how to identify the rating of the component component from wall heater 2.jpg
     
  10. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    I am afraid that without a marking of some kind it is impossible to know it's rating :(
     
  11. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    Yeah. Hellas Techn is right. I gave you a bum scoop on the epoxy color. Whenever I replaced one of these, I just
    went down to the local parts appliance store and the owner matched what I needed with his stock by the color of the epoxy. (He only stocked one manufacturer, and the temperature ranges were known) I've searched the internet, and every manufacturer uses their own color code now, and there are a lot of different manufacturers in the business now. It looks like you have white epoxy, and different manufacturers use that
    color for different temperature ranges.
    Any possibility you can contact the manufacturer of your heater, and find out from them what the thermal fuse rating is?
    Maybe buy a replacement from them?
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2016
  12. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Searching for the heater just gives all the distributors. I'm pretty certain they wouldn't be able to help. Even if I did find the manufacturer I doubt they'd sell me one thermal fuse. Thank you everybody for the help, I've learnt something new - but i guess my heater is going in the bin
     
  13. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    It would have originally looked something like the enclosed image.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Wirewolf

    Wirewolf

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    Nov 3, 2016
    Thanks Bluejets - markings on the component would help! I have another heater, exatcly the same model (still working) The thermal fuse in that heater is also completely blank with no markings apart from the coloured end. Unfortunately my broken heater is now in a skip...
     
  15. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    it probably was like the ones in bluejets image, but the heat has totally discoloured it

    They are NOT designed to be repaired by non skilled people ... that's how house fires etc happen
     
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