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Underwater Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Ryan Bush, Feb 14, 2017.

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  1. Ryan Bush

    Ryan Bush

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    Feb 14, 2017
    I have a small welded grid made of standard steel rebar that I want to submerge in the ocean (I live on the coast) and apply a VERY low electric current to.

    The current has to be 50 amp / 12 v or less. Would I use an anode rod? Would it be easiest to use a portable generator or a cord to an outlet? How could I make it waterproof? Any insight would be extremely helpful!!!

    Thanks,
    Ryan

    [email protected]
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Cathodic protection is a rather involved and expensive arrangement especially when one starts running zinc anodes.

    50 amp is not a "very low" current in any way or form.

    Forget portable generators, bad idea.
     
    davenn and Ryan Bush like this.
  3. Ryan Bush

    Ryan Bush

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    Feb 14, 2017
    Thank you! I'm completely clueless, evidently, and I'm trying to replicate this process at home.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biorock

    Do you think this is feasible? The current has to initiates an electrolytic reaction, I'm just following what I can find online. Would this device create an electrolytic reaction? https://www.amazon.com/Lightning-Reaction-Reloaded-Shocking-Game/dp/B0006B2Q50
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    agreed, that's 600W of power, ..... hope you have a zillion$$ bank account to pay the power bill

    dunno where you got the 50 Amps from ? didn't notice it in your first link
     
  5. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    No.
    "Requires 3 AAA batteries – NOT INCLUDED. "
    Plus I'm assuming it's output is ac, not controlled, no feedback, etc etc.

    I hinted before at where you might find more information about this, but I guess you missed it.
    Look for anything on Cathodic Protection, especially with respect to impurities in iron/steel and the like.
     
  6. Ryan Bush

    Ryan Bush

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    Feb 14, 2017

    Don't know where that 50 amps came from either! I spoke with my friend and he says the lower the amps the better. . .
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Then save yourself a lot of trouble by using 0 Amps.

    Bob
     
  8. Ryan Bush

    Ryan Bush

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    Feb 14, 2017
    I am admittedly clueless about this and trying my best to learn.

    I don't even know the difference between volts and amps! I've attached an image that illustrates the structure I want to create, any insight you can provide to someone with ZERO electronics knowledge would be great! If not, is there a better place online to ask my questions?
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Posting a link or 2 to your references might get a bit more assistance.
    Current illustrations are rather vague especially since you are requiring technical assistance.
     
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