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Tutorials to start with

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by alsaf, Nov 1, 2011.

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  1. alsaf

    alsaf

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    0
    Oct 2, 2011
    I just noticed that this site has a lot of tutorials and I was wondering if there are any specific ones that could be recommenced to start with?

    I was also wondering if there is any good tutorials on the basics of using a multi-meter?
     
  2. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010
    Since you are asking how to use a multi-meter, you might just want to start at the beginning of the tutorial section. Each section builds upon the last, so jumping around is only gonna confuse you if you don't have any idea.

    If I misinterpreted your level of knowledge on the subject I apologize.
     
  3. alsaf

    alsaf

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    0
    Oct 2, 2011
    I wasn't sure if the tutorial section was in any order. The last time I had did any theory like this was in Physics at school and that was a very long time ago!
     
  4. daddles

    daddles

    443
    3
    Jun 10, 2011
    Also take a look at the tutorial stuff at http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/; click on the links at the top of the page. Most of the stuff is pretty good; some of it is excellent. I especially like the fact that they put numerous experiments out there. Make sure you do experiments; otherwise, your knowledge will be a bit shallow.
     
  5. alsaf

    alsaf

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    0
    Oct 2, 2011
    Thanks for the link daddles.

    That does make sense about increasing knowledge with experiments because I had bought an educational electronics kit which has details of experiments and I had actually learned more by investigating the reasons why one of them did not work.
     
  6. daddles

    daddles

    443
    3
    Jun 10, 2011
    Absolutely, alsaf -- right on! You will learn far more (and have it stick better) by learning to troubleshoot your experimental circuits. The reason is that it teaches you to build a mental model of what's going on (or a mentor can help with building that model). Then you compare what you see with what you expect and adjust things appropriately. If the circuit still doesn't behave the way you expect, then you begin to suspect that your model is wrong -- and learning is guaranteed. :)
     
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