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Turning a flashing led circuit into solid? Pics inside

Discussion in 'LEDs and Optoelectronics' started by Popeyethesailorman, Nov 5, 2016.

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  1. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Hello all,

    I am a Christmas light enthusiast. This year I upgraded my show to a 32channel light-o-rama controller. I also bought an extra 60 (cheap) 100ct led light strands thinking I could use them with the controller. I didn't count on every time they go on and off them cycling through the seven options of flashing and dancing lights.

    Pictures can describe better than me so here it is. I have a soldering iron for elecronics but don't know the language and how to follow diagrams. I've fixed boards before with success by finding the damaged part, removing and replacing it. I've actually been successful a few times so I'm happy to solder, but I know these need to be stepped down from the 110-120v that I'm plugging them into.

    Thanks in advance for any help, and for taking the time to consider my problem.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Looks like a non-isolated output, rather dangerous bit of gear to be strapping around the room at Christmas ( or any other time)
     
  5. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016

    Attached Files:

  6. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Also, all of them will be outside. They were marketed as waterproof. Clearly the control piece isn't so I was going to ensure they stay dry.
     
  7. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    I replied again but put a link and it required moderator approval. If you google led-stringstrip-circuit-diagram-using it should come up. And in that message I stated that all of these are going to be outside. They're marketed as waterproof and I'll protect that box. Actually, can I dip them in wax to waterproof them? Otherwise just planning upside down red solo cups upside down wrapped in cellophane to close them off and secure them from getting wet
     
  8. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    And I forgot this picture
     

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  9. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Relevance is in the non-isolated factor, not whether it gets wet or not.
     
  10. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    .


    Sir Popeyethesailorman . . . . . . . . . .Bluto here . . . . .

    Here is a breakdown of what you are showing us.

    There is a wallwart transformer which supplies reduced line voltage to the board as shown on the pictorial markup.
    That feeds the 4 diodes on the board configured as a Full Wave Bridge to create DC voltage for the electrolytic on the board.
    This supply takes care of the two LED strings ad the electronics on this board.
    The electronics consists of the Chip On Board . . .marked up in FUCHSIA which is a micro integrated circuit that is mounted underneath the black epoxy blob on the side of the phenolic board. That unit has two outputs at the YELLOW lines that are feeding to 2 separate LED string drivers.
    All of your flashing timing and lighting inter relationships are fix programmed within that COB chip.
    The 2 drivers then just sequentially and appropriately activate the LED strings with them additionally using a common and shared power supply line .
    Then there is the corner activation switch.

    Should you want to add other LED light strings that would be related to the power level capability of the transformer wall wart and the changing of the drivers to slightly beefier versions.
    Some info needed, would be the power in and out specs written on the wall wart, the parts identification taken from of one of the drivers.
    The insertion of a DVM in its current measuring mode and seeing the current consumption of one of the strings of LEDs would also be needed.
    Additionally one would need to compute those same specifications of one of the new added LED strings.

    What say ye . . . . any further queries ?

    COMBINED ILLUSTRATION:

    [​IMG]


    73's de Edd

    .
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2016
    Popeyethesailorman likes this.
  11. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Bluto,

    Never thought you'd be the one to help me.... lol.

    Thank you very much. I'll try to get all that together today and get back to you

    Popeye
     
  12. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    I
    Since I'm not sure what's what, here goes.

    1,2 - processors marked "pcr406x"
    3 - "green, black, red, yellow, gold" top to bottom rings
    4,5,6,7 - (diodes I think) "in4004 MC"
    8 - COB chip g 803
    9 - "r&g, -40+105C, uf 4.7, v50"
    10 - "green, red, yellow, gold" top to bottom

    Trying to upload pic corresponding to board
     
  13. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Here it is. Thank you again for your help.

    An idea I had was to take out the chip and solder a jumper between all of them. One of the sequences it has built in is all on so it should be able to handle the load?

    As for a volt meter, I have a few but we moved in the last few months and they are still packed in my workshop.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Don't know where the image of a "wallwart" is......??????
     
  15. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    That is everything except on the first led there's some resistor I think, it's one with the colored rings as described above. No traditionally looking wallwart
     
  16. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Popeye,
    wallwart same as image below ( without the filter) for future reference ...cheers...Jorgo :)
     

    Attached Files:

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  17. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Thanks I thought it was a coil of copper wire that either boosted or broke down the amount of electricity that passed through it.

    This one is a simple clear plug. Nothing but two wires that plug into the wall.

    Trying to figure out my volt meter while trying to isolate power paths, I shorted one of the boards by touching two of the diodes (on the silver side of the black tube) at the same time.
     
  18. Popeyethesailorman

    Popeyethesailorman

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    Nov 5, 2016
    Sir de Edd,

    There is no wall wart, it is a standard two prong plug. Not a traditional wallwart. It is 120in 120out directly to the board.

    Thank you for any input. I've fried one now just using a tester on it.

    Popeye
     
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