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turning a 1" shaft with a stationary 12v motor

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Mike, Mar 20, 2007.

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  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    I need to slowly turn a 1" shaft clockwise and counter-clockwiset
    with
    a small 12v DC motor. The motor doesn't need a lot of torque. The
    motor needs to be
    stationary and connected to some device that will turn the shaft. I've
    looked around
    the web and with no success. Any suggestions?

    Mike
     

  2. A newsgroup that deals with mechanical issues would be a good start.

    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  3. A gearmotor. Allelectronics.com
     
  4. How bout just a belt? If it just need to be slow and no torque then using a
    rubber band might even work. Although when changing direction there might be
    some slipping.
     
  5. christopher

    christopher Guest


    Hello Mike,

    If your not wanting to use a stepper motor then a auto Window Motor
    might work. It is permanent magnet right angle gear motor. High output
    torque for many DC applications. Use a dc voltage controller to adjust
    the speed.

    SPECIFICATIONS
    a.. RPM 150 at 12 VDC no load
    b.. Voltage 12 DC
    c.. Amps 3-1/2 no load
    d.. Reversible
    e.. Duty continuous

    Good Luck,

    * * *
    Christopher

    Temecula CA.USA
    http://www.oldtemecula.com
     
  6. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    Support the shaft on pillow blocks and drive it with sprockets on
    the motor shaft and the shaft and a chain connecting them?

    Or put a pinion on the motor shaft and drive the supported shaft
    with a mating gear.
     
  7. You don't need torque then just find a piece of rubber hose to mate the
    shaft with the motor, use a geared reduction motor to turn it slowly. Also
    you can simply strap the motor to a piece of board for the support.
     
  8. You could construct a gearbox using standard parts for models or you might
    do it with pulleys and belts. Pulleys could be made to size from wood or
    plastic.

    R
     
  9. hi, how about a window wiper motor , or a door glass electric motor from
    a car ?


    mark k
     
  10. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    Even easier, just slip a small piece of rubber hose over the motor
    shaft, and use it as a friction drive against the 1" shaft. You'll
    need to be able to apply tension to the motor to control the
    friction, easily done with a spring. There are lots of variants
    on this scheme. If you can put a rubber tire around the 1" shaft
    then the bare motor shaft can drive it. Or use an intermediate
    rubber idler. Take apart an old tape recorder to get some parts.
    The capstan pressure roller would make a good idler. Many
    units have rubber-rimmed driven wheels to try.

    Best regards,


    Bob Masta

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
    Scope, Spectrum, Spectrogram, Signal Generator
    Science with your sound card!
     


  11. Neither of those motors are designed for continuos duty service.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  12. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    They're also about 10,000% overkill for the OPs original question:
    "I need to slowly turn a 1" shaft clockwise and counter-clockwiset with
    a small 12v DC motor. The motor doesn't need a lot of torque. ..."

    Rat Shack has a cute little "Hobby Motor":
    http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...origkw=DC+Motor&kw=dc+motor&parentPage=search
    This one's cheaper:
    http://www.alltronics.com/cgi-bin/item/94M007/37/12-VDC-Hobby-Motor

    although, either of these (or any other similar motor you could find
    with a simple google search) might need to be geared down considerably.

    Cheers!
    Rich
     
  13. http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category/400400/DC_Gear_Motors.html

    http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/item/DCM-276/400/5_RPM_GEAR_MOTOR,_12VDC_.html

    5 RPM GEAR MOTOR, 12VDC

    Rugged 5 RPM gear motor designed to move baffles in automotive air
    conditioning. Ideal for continuous or intermittent use where power, slow
    rotation, low noise and low current are desired. Drive mechanism consists of
    a small DC motor with a worm gear driving a four gear train. Final drive is
    a plastic splined shaft, 0.52" diameter x 0.5" long. The composite plastic
    housing is easily opened for access to the motor, gears and electrical
    terminals. Overall dimensions of assembly including mounting flanges and
    shaft is approximately 3.12" x 4.25" x 1.62." No load measurements: 5 RPM @
    13.5 Vdc @ 15 mA.
    CAT# DCM-276

    Your Price: $9.00 each
     
  14. jasen

    jasen Guest

    You're after a small antenna rotator?

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
  15. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Thanks for all the suggestions. The problem I'm having is finding a
    gear to fit around the (after I actually measured it) 1.125" shaft.
    The largest gear I found had a .98" bore hole. I did find a gear with
    the right bore hole but it was steel (a little overkill) at $90. I've
    also been looking at cog belts but the same problem, can't find a
    matching gear.
     
  16. Some of the surplus places sell them. Don't ignore cogbelts and the wheels
    for them.
     
  17. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Please follow convention and bottom-post, thanks.

    Depending on what torque you need, I'd think just a wheel and a
    big rubber band for a belt could do the trick, or a wheel with a
    rubber "tire" that the motor shaft spins against, a la capstan
    and pinch roller

    Or, if you get a piece of plastic, and you're handy with tools,
    you could make a gear in your workshop.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  18. jasen

    jasen Guest

    I've seen wipers running for hours on end, but yeah a car that's done
    500000km (300000mi) may have only been running for less than a year.

    still a wiper motor is likely to outlast a toy motor
    or a cheap tool motor.

    Bye.
    Jasen
     
  19. jasen

    jasen Guest

    Wiper motors don't have a lot of torque compared to winch motors...
    OP didn't give a figure for "not a lot".

    Bye.
    Jasen
     

  20. You think so? A wiper motor is usually mounted where moist air can
    blow across it, to help cool it. Do you have any idea how much current
    a wiper motor uses, even with no load? Do you have any idea how many
    hours a wiper motor is built to run? I have replace three or four that
    have failed in the 35+ years that I've been driving, and I never ran the
    wipers that much.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
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