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Transistor in a Halloween Prop

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by scorn001, Oct 19, 2018.

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  1. scorn001

    scorn001

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    Oct 19, 2018
    I'm looking for a replacement to a transistor in an old Halloween prop I'm in the process of repairing.

    On the part itself, I'm seeing "HSB772", however Googling that seems to lead me to a TO-126L package part. This one looks like a TO-92, which I think would a "HSB772S" possibly.

    I've found data sheets for the part, but that's about as far as I can get. I'm unable to find a location to purchase that part, and I'm unable to find an available replacement - and being a software guy - I really don't have the expertise.

    Hoping someone else will have a little more knowledge than I.

    Pic of the component in question is attached.

    Any help would be appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    It's probably a 2SB772 given the way those numbering system go and the datasheet I found for that one seems correct too.
    The device has blown quite spectacularly indicating other issues apart from the destroyed device - can you post a wider picture of the area?
     
  3. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir scorn001 . . . . .

    Q21 assignment tells us that this little puppy must be absolutely stuffed with other transistors. ( Circa '80's vintage construction)
    The nearby TIP ??? power transistor might be a like candidate for having crashed and dumped into this unit in case this unit is being its driver.

    73's de Edd
    .....
     
    Richard9025 likes this.
  4. scorn001

    scorn001

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    Oct 19, 2018

    This device drives a motor that opens a set of curtains in the front, revealing the "All Seeing Zultan!". That part had failed previously, and my children desperately wanted to see and play with in. So I physically fixed the curtains open with some wire. When that motor failed, and then the repeated use caused the failure is my guess. A smart person would have unplugged the motor connector :).

    That motor did test bad, it's possible there are other failure points though.

    I've attached more photos.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. scorn001

    scorn001

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    Oct 19, 2018
    This thing was actually marketed and sold back 2006-2007 I believe. I'm thinking the failure of the motor this part was driving was possibly the cause of the failure?

    Thank you.
     
  6. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Yup, I'd go with testing/replacing the larger transistor that drives the motor too.
     
  7. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    In what way 'bad' - a motor will test as good as a 'short-circuit' under even normal measuring techniques.
    Just apply power to the motor directly (battery?) and see if it does as it should.
     
  8. scorn001

    scorn001

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    Oct 19, 2018
    Yes, sorry I should have been more clear. I applied power with a bench supply - no workie.
     
  9. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Motor bustie.

    New motor, new transistor(s), fixie, fixie.
     
    scorn001 likes this.
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