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transformer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by seankee101, Apr 26, 2013.

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  1. seankee101

    seankee101

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    Apr 26, 2013
  2. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    What 2 outputs are you looking for? Do they share a common ground, or must they be isolated from each other?

    Bob
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there
    welcome to the forums :)

    You do understand that the transformer output is a 15V - 0V - 15V output
    it HAS 2 outputs ;) each one is 15VAC

    the 0V wire is your common wire

    Dave
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Unless he wants 2 isolated outputs. Which is what I assumed when he is talking about cutting the windings.

    Bob
     
  5. quantumtangles

    quantumtangles

    152
    3
    Dec 19, 2012
    Is it a transformer which acts as a voltage divider? Which is to say, is the supply voltage 30 volts, (voltage into the device) but (instead of using resistors in parallel as in a conventional voltage divider), the ratio of windings results in a split power supply comprised of three terminals.

    One of the three terminals is +15v. The central terminal is zero volts and the third terminal is -15v?

    I think you may already have two outputs, using a common ground (the central zero volt terminal). Check out whether the 15v outputs are respectively +15v and -15v using a multimeter. If so (subject to the views of more august entities here present) it may be you have two outputs already.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    No, they're all AC.
     
  7. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,838
    1,952
    Sep 5, 2009
    yup possibly :) but he hasnt come back to confirm that ....

    regardless, it would take little effort to split the loop that comes out onto the 0V terminal
    and easily produce 2 separate windings. No digging into the transformer required


    Dave
     
  8. quantumtangles

    quantumtangles

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    3
    Dec 19, 2012
    Sorry Steve. I understand now.
     
  9. quantumtangles

    quantumtangles

    152
    3
    Dec 19, 2012
    The basic mistake I made was this.

    Transformers require alternating current to work. They cannot work with direct current. Doh.
     
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