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Transceiver Circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Ty Ban, Aug 27, 2017.

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  1. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Where the schematic tells you to.
     
  2. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    the negative to the ground and the positive is to the transmitter or to the receiver?
     
  3. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    The schematic shows the speaker connected to the common pin of a change-over switch that is part of the transmit/receive push button.
     
  4. Irv

    Irv

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    Jun 7, 2017
    I think the question is how to find which "common" or center pin on that multi-pole switch is the correct one to connect the speaker to. If, like most really cheap stuff, they didn't bother to run traces out to a neat, nicely-labeled solder point on the edge of the board, then how to determine where the lead would have been connected? Other than visually tracing with a magnifying glass?
     
    CDRIVE likes this.
  5. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    So what's their common pin?
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    there ISNT a single common there are 4 commons for the 4 switches
    those 4 switches just happen to be tied together in a single package to that when 1 is operated, all of them operate at the same time


    xceiver.JPG
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2017
  7. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Here is the connection of the switch, where should I connect the speaker? Or does any of that four is ok?
     

    Attached Files:

  8. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    I believe the pins I've marked "C" are the common pins for the 4 groups of SPDT contacts. The pins directly above and below each common are the two poles for each SPDT switch.
    Because they're packaged as a single switch package this switch is classified as a 4PDT slide switch.

    Chris
    upload_2017-9-5_11-15-24.png
     
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  9. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    This is how the switch works:
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    When I translate it in the actual pcb layout, does the copper for the pin ( the pin before the common pins ) is connected to the copper of the common pins?
     

    Attached Files:

  11. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    No! What AG drew are not jumper wires or copper traces. They're movable bars internal to the switch. He's indicating which contacts are closed (shorted) in the switch positions indicated.

    Chris
     
  12. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    So you mean that in the pcb, all 12 pins have individual copper and non are connected to each other ? (just like what I send in the picture)
     
  13. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Yes, that's correct. This [ and this ] are inside the switch.

    I tried to find an animated slide switch on the net but didn't get any hits. The visual would help you understand.

    Chris
     
  14. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    And those 4 arrows will be connected to their 4 common pins, is that right?
     
  15. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Another, is the arrow above the 39n is a potentiometer?
     

    Attached Files:

  16. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    The arrow above the 39nF capacitor is the slider of a 10k ohms potentiometer. It is used only when the switch is in the Transmit mode. What do you think it adjusts?
     
  17. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    The volume? What the slider is for?
     
  18. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Thus I need a slider potentiometer or just a potetiometer ?
     
  19. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    A potentiometer is a resistor with a slider (the arrow) that you can slide along the resistance. You can move the slider anywhere from one end to the other end of the resistance or anywhere in between.
    Take a potentiometer apart to see the resistance and the slider.
     
  20. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    The arrows "indicate" the 4 common pins.

    Ty, you really should spend some time reading our basic electronics section.
    Chris
     
    davenn likes this.
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