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Transceiver Circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Ty Ban, Aug 27, 2017.

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  1. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Help me to create a new circuit were the power switch is on the right side and the push switch ( with 12 pins ) is on the left side. I'm confuse about the connection of the transmit and receive part. Please help me. transceiver.jpg
     
  2. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Not sure what your problem is?

    In transmit, you have to look at the circuit with the 'arrows' connected to the points marked 'T' and for receive you look at the circuit with the 'arrows' connected to the points marked 'R'.

    It may be a useful exercise for you to print out two copies of the schematic and physcially erase the non-connected parts of the circuits when the switch is in either the 'T' or 'R' position.

    But simply, in R (receive) Q1 operates as an oscillator/mixer in a 'direct conversion' way with Q2,3 and 4 as the main audio amplification - outputting to the loudspeaker.

    In transmit (T), Q1 oscillates using the 27MHz crystal, the RF is fed to Q2/3 and the speaker is used as a microphone via Q2 to modulate the RF.
     
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  3. BobK

    BobK

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    You realize that a schematic has nothing to do with the placement of the parts, right?

    Bob
     
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  4. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    My problem is that I want the 12 pins switch in the left side but the problem is that I'm kinda cofuse about the connection of the T and R in the 12 pins.
     
  5. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    I wanted to have a simple circiut component arrangement cause I'm confused about the design. Help please
     
  6. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    The circuit, as drawn, is pefectly understandable given that it is drawn in the 'conventional' sense - positive rail at the top, ground rail at the bottom and elemental parts of the design from left-to-right.

    Individually the various sections are also drawn conventionally - the oscillator, the amplifier.

    It is perfectly 'understandable' to anyone with the proper training and understanding of schematics.

    I (we) don't understand what your problem really is? As far as the schematic is concerned, it couldn't be simpler....
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

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    Are you talking about the position of the components in the scematic, or the position in the circuit when built?

    Bob
     
  8. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    It is an extremely simple circuit with very poor performance. It was used in a child's toy walkie-talkie.
     
  9. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Both sir. I wanted to know where are the components are place.
     
  10. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    My problem here sir/ma'am is that I wanted to know the position of the components when it is in the pcb, cause I want to change their position (if it is not right according to whatmy professor want). I'm still learning at the moment to read and annalyze circuits.
     
  11. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    The component positions on the pcb tend to follow their placement in the schematic except where circuits might cause self-inductance/interference between sections, in which case they are eihter 'screened' of they are placed at a distance that minimises the effects.

    For circuits that are already constructed, the manufacturer normally provides the parts placement diagram and component designation overlay. If you are intending to draw your own (i.e reverse engineer) then you have to do that yourself.
     
  12. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    I wanted to know the components position in real world, even just a draft. You see I'm just beginning to study how to read a circuit.

    Question, does a 12 pins push switch is the switch (for transmit and receive) is what I'm going to need? if so, does all 12 pins will be used according to the diagram?
     
  13. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Can you show me the position of the components in the pcb? I'm confuse specially for the 12 pins push switch. and wether all the pins (of the 12 pins) will be used.
     
  14. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Are you asking us to design a printed circuit board for you?

    The 12 pins are all used.
     
  15. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    I just want to know the components position in the pcb using that circuit.

    Ah ok thanks
     
  16. BobK

    BobK

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    They are whereever you put them.

    Bob
     
  17. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    what 12 pin switch ??
    the TX/RX uses a 8 pin switch
     
  18. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    The schematic doesn't show the 'common' terminal for the four change-over contacts so there really are 12 pins.
     
  19. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    yeah yeah ... my bad I should have counted that :rolleyes::rolleyes:
     
  20. Ty Ban

    Ty Ban

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Where should I connect the speaker?
     
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