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Tracks to nowhere?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Mike Tomlinson, Dec 13, 2012.

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  1. +1. It's about the right size for a printed cellphone system (3G)
    antenna. Reinforced by the SIM1 and SIM2 letering by it.
     
  2. they are tuned circuits. open ended transmission lines. Or a bored
    draughtsman doodling..


    --
    Ineptocracy

    (in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
    lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
    members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
    rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
    diminishing number of producers.
     
  3. ah. could be that as well as a tuned circuit.


    --
    Ineptocracy

    (in-ep-toc’-ra-cy) – a system of government where the least capable to
    lead are elected by the least capable of producing, and where the
    members of society least likely to sustain themselves or succeed, are
    rewarded with goods and services paid for by the confiscated wealth of a
    diminishing number of producers.
     
  4. Brian Gaff

    Brian Gaff Guest

    Maybe they used to make very big wedding cakes there and when they wanted to
    move them...
    There is a song about it
    Tracks of my Tiers.

    OK I'll go to sleep again now.

    Brian
     
  5. Geo

    Geo Guest

  6. Guest

    I'm the person who posted the picture, and I should have mentioned
    that it's a PC motherboard, MSI brand, model Z68A-G43(G3). It has
    no wireless built into it.

    I once found an antenna inside a Panasonic-made CRT monitor,
    around the flyback. It was 1-2 pieces of circuit board material,
    each about 3" long and 1/2" wide. In the schematic, it was
    connected to a flyback winding that went nowhere else. Apparently
    the antenna put out a signal to counteract interference generated
    by the flyback.
    transformer.
     
  7. Yes, I've seen similar things on PC motherboards, where it's important
    to keep the tracks between the CPU/memory controller and the memory
    slots the same length.

    That isn't what the OP photo shows, though. I certainly agree with
    those that think it's an antenna of some kind. Figuring out what "SIM1
    and "SIM2" mean might be a clue.
     
  8. tony sayer

    tony sayer Guest

    Well is the just simply a PC motherboard?.

    If so then very unlikely thats a anything to do with SIM cards, it
    prolly means something completely different;!.

    It might be that the designer thought it looked nice, and it broke up a
    bit of the board that had no copper tracks on;)...
     
  9. polygonum

    polygonum Guest

    MSI Z68A-G43(G3) desktop motherboard

    http://www.techiehq.net/pc-hardware/copper-traces-nowhere-msi-motherboard-87549.html
     
  10. We did some boards where the vias were no bigger than the tracks so a
    track that apparently ended actually went through.
    It doesn't look like that here though as the other vias are quite big.
     
  11. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    After downloading your image, copying, and overlaying it seems that
    the two patterns do NOT lie on top each other, rather form small
    loops. *IF* there is a gnd plane between, doesn't matter if they
    overlay or not. They do appear to be the same length of run and do
    appear to have a 'guard trace' along each side. But either the vias
    are super tiny which doesn't appear to be the case since vias can be
    seen in adjacent areas, or those guard traces are floating.

    The two sets of pads, SIM1 and SIM2, look like either simply
    mechanical access points. If you took an instrument like a network
    analyzer with small pointy tips, it looks possible to touch SIM1 &
    SIM2 from either side; which would allow you to measure the
    transmission line characteristics of both the outside layer processes
    and check/control the PCB manufacturing. That's my vote. Although
    we've always laid the test traces nearer to the outside, unused areas
    of the PCB and therefore the traces were straight.

    Just as a note, the vias in that adjacent area look VERY close
    together which would cause the power/GND planes to have large holes
    cut into them rather than a series of small holes. -- Usually
    considered not good for signal integrity AND especially EMC issues.

    Did anybody find out what that chip, ASMEDIA ASM1083 does?
     
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