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Tidal power Science project.

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by [email protected], Feb 20, 2008.

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  1. Guest

    I am just curious if anyone has thought about a float that is lifted
    up against a ratchet and pawl to the highest point, then released at
    the lowest point of the tide to fall at 1G. It seems, intuitively ,
    that the stored energyu/ impetus would give greater burstsof energy
    from aDC motor, which could be stored in a supercap, then bled off
    slowly to smooth out the oulse. Just noodling, I haven't had the time
    to think it through, so I am tossing raw meat into the midst of the
    pack and await enlightenment. ;>
    Kwiz
     
  2. dalai lamah

    dalai lamah Guest

    Un bel giorno digitò:
    Yes, someone did:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_power
     
  3. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

    Talk to someone who owns a boat that is used in saltwater.
    It is a very nasty environment.
    Even after using semi-exotic materials (e.g. stainless steel),
    there are high maintenance requirements.
     
  4. krw

    krw Guest

    If that's your only concern, use the tides in bodies of fresh water.
     
  5. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    On Wed, 20 Feb 2008 09:17:41 -0800, wrote:

    :I am just curious if anyone has thought about a float that is lifted
    :up against a ratchet and pawl to the highest point, then released at
    :the lowest point of the tide to fall at 1G. It seems, intuitively ,
    :that the stored energyu/ impetus would give greater burstsof energy
    :from aDC motor, which could be stored in a supercap, then bled off
    :slowly to smooth out the oulse. Just noodling, I haven't had the time
    :to think it through, so I am tossing raw meat into the midst of the
    :pack and await enlightenment. ;>
    :Kwiz


    The CETO wave power system looks to be promising.
    http://www.ceto.com.au/home.php

    Mechanical ratchet and pawl systems are high maintenance and not suitable for
    long and reliable service imo.
     
  6. MooseFET

    MooseFET Guest

    A different way to implement the idea:

    Imagine a tube pointing down into the water. As the water rises, the
    air trapped in the tube will be compressed. A check valve at the top
    of the tube directs this compressed air into a tank. As the water
    falls, the column of water creates a vacuum at the top of the tube. A
    check valve causes this vacuum to create a vacuum in a second tank.
    An air motor between the two tanks can provide an output.
     
  7. MooseFET

    MooseFET Guest


    It will only be cycling a couple of times per day. Such things can be
    made to last for 100,000 cycles with careful design. 274 years is
    long enough.
     
  8. nospam

    nospam Guest

    The idea is dumb. The energy generated by float falling a few feet twice a
    day would never recover the energy use to construct it.

    A 1000kg float falling 2m twice a day with 100% conversion efficiency would
    produce about 450mW. About enough to make one cup of tea every 3 days.

    --
     
  9. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    :> On Wed, 20 Feb 2008 09:17:41 -0800, wrote:
    :>
    :> :I am just curious if anyone has thought about a float that is lifted
    :> :up against a ratchet and pawl to the highest point, then released at
    :> :the lowest point of the tide to fall at 1G. It seems, intuitively ,
    :> :that the stored energyu/ impetus would give greater burstsof energy
    :> :from aDC motor, which could be stored in a supercap, then bled off
    :> :slowly to smooth out the oulse. Just noodling, I haven't had the time
    :> :to think it through, so I am tossing raw meat into the midst of the
    :> :pack and await enlightenment. ;>
    :> :Kwiz
    :>
    :> The CETO wave power system looks to be
    promising.http://www.ceto.com.au/home.php
    :>
    :> Mechanical ratchet and pawl systems are high maintenance and not suitable for
    :> long and reliable service imo.
    :
    :
    :It will only be cycling a couple of times per day. Such things can be
    :made to last for 100,000 cycles with careful design. 274 years is
    :long enough.

    Aside from the mechanical reliability, about which you are probably correct, and
    going by the description in the OP's post, there would be only 2 energy
    generation periods per day, ie. whenever low tide occurred. If I choose a
    suitable location in my state where tides are roughly 8M
    http://161.152.28.103:10003/pls/lweb/cdc_tide_prediction I see that low tides
    generally occur when energy demand is not exactly at its peak. This method of
    energy generation would not be particularly efficient unless there was some way
    of storing the energy for later use to make it viable as a base power generation
    source.

    CETO, on the other hand is continuous in action 24/7, relying upon simple wave
    action for its operation. As they say "many hands (pumps in this case) make
    light (no pun) work", thus making it suitable for a use as a base power
    generating source.
     
  10. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    :Aside from the mechanical reliability, about which you are probably correct,
    and
    :going by the description in the OP's post, there would be only 2 energy
    :generation periods per day, ie. whenever low tide occurred. If I choose a
    :suitable location in my state where tides are roughly 8M
    :http://161.152.28.103:10003/pls/lweb/cdc_tide_prediction I see that low tides
    SNIP

    Sorry, that link won't work directly I have found.

    You will need to go here http://www.dpi.wa.gov.au/imarine/coastaldata/1328.asp
    and select BROOME and then in the next screen hit search to display the 7 day
    tidal data.
     
  11. Not a very high percentage of the earth's coastlines have tides
    anywhere near that high (it's caused by oceanic slop like in the
    corner of a square bucket), and mostly they aren't high population
    areas anyhow, as it's much harder to build port facilities.

    The average neap tide is 0.5m, king tide is 1.5m, between high and
    low. Multiply that difference by the mass of your float and you
    have the maximum available energy. You'd need to cover several
    square kilometers of area with floating objects that could derive
    useful power from motion that has average twice-daily peaks of
    0.07mm/second (0.26m/hour). It's just not viable.

    Doing something with tidal flow in/out of a large estuary or bay,
    now that's a possibility. I even recall seeing a proposed scheme to
    dam the Mediterranean, which has a net inflow from the Atlantic,
    and use the drop to reclaim sea-front land and generate GW. It'll
    never happen though.

    Clifford Heath.
     
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