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The One and Only Quantum of Heat

Discussion in 'General Electronics' started by Anomaly Magnetism, Oct 9, 2003.

  1. The Quantum of heat is the thermon and only the thermon. OKAY. Not the
    electron, not the photon, and not the phonon. If you disgree please
    check out: http://www.journaloftheoretics.com/Articles/3-4/commentary3-4.htm

    Jacob Ghitis states in the Journal of Theoretics:

    "I insist in the existence of the "thermon," as a quantum of
    heat. (Curiously, I just read for the first time about "thermion," a
    name no longer in use, since it was applied to the electrons ejected
    from the cathode of the vacuum tubes, which no longer are in use.) The
    phonon would be a quantum of "infra-thermic" energy, also a
    manifestation of vibrating electrons. The photons emitted by
    electrons "excited" in a peculiar way manifested by allegedly jumping
    to a higher orbit, are peculiar electric manifestations."

    Electron is the quantum of negative electricity and not heat

    Photon is the quantum of electromagnetic radiation (including light)
    and not heat.

    Phonon is the quantum of mechanical vibration (including sound) and
    not heat.
     
  2. So a phonon is quantum of mechanical vibration ...

    What is wrong with that? It seems good enough. All this other stuff seems to
    violate the spirit of Occam's razor. Before investing my time, what new
    insight will I get? How will knowledge of statistical mechanics be improved
    or simplified?

    Bill
     
  3. Generally, equations dealing with variables involving the transfer of
    energy known of as heat, do not occur at such small levels that
    quantitisation from specific, individual atomic or molecular orbital
    transitions or photonic transfer is significant. They usually deal
    with ensembles of large numbers of atoms or molecules, or measured
    values at scales much larger than those involving singlular atomic or
    molecular orbital energies.
     
  4. Phonon is still not the quantum of heat
    1. How to direct heat energy to a desired source.

    2. Perhaps discovering the anti-thermon.
    Anti-thermons could be used to cool the environment without
    circulating air. Imagine an quiet "air-conditioner" that does not
    circulate air but just cools a room.

    Anti-thermons could also be used to cool electrical equipment. No more
    CPU fans would be needed. Electrostatic would no longer fry silicon
    chips. You could turn up your amp to the maximum volume with clipping
    spikes without worrying the tweeter(s) over-heating.

    Neuro-electronics could be used for medicine without thermally
    damaging tissues.
     
  5. You are making things more complicated than necessary to describe nature.
    Now that I thought about this a bit more, you left out them most important
    benefit. It will become possible to construct a perpetual motion device of
    the second kind!

    Bill
     
  6. daestrom

    daestrom Guest

    The 'phonon' is used to describe the transfer of heat between atomic
    particles in direct contact. Heat conduction through solids has been
    studied for years and the accepted term for the movement of heat through
    solids at the atomic level is the 'phonon'.

    The mechanical vibration (translational, torsional, and longitudinal) of
    molecules *is* heat.

    daestrom
     
  7. What about the movement of heat through an empty space?
     
  8. This paragraph is not quite correct. Phonons are vibrations that cover large
    volumes but interact locally. A good analogy is the electromagnetic field
    that is extensive but manifests itself locally as when a photoelectron is
    emitted out of a photosurface.
    Heat as such does not move through empty space, unless you are referring to
    the term "radiant heat." In that case, it is an electromagnetic transfer
    just as light is.

    Bill
     
  9. C'mon, you know better than that. Heat doesn't travel through empty space.
     
  10. Does "radiant heat" travel at lightspeed?
     
  11. Hi Anomaly;

    Yes, basically this is infra red light.
    So it travels at the speed of light in free space.

    Duane

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  12. Then a "HASER" (Heat Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of
    Radiation) would be another name for an IR laser. Right?
     
  13. Hi Anomaly;

    Not right. We shouldn't be using the term "radiant heat"
    in the first place. Heat doesn't radiate.
    Heat can conduct or convect but not radiate.

    Duane

    --
    Home of the $35 Solar Tracker Receiver
    http://www.redrok.com/electron.htm#led3X [*]
    Powered by \ \ \ //|
    Thermonuclear Solar Energy from the Sun / |
    Energy (the SUN) \ \ \ / / |
    Red Rock Energy \ \ / / |
    Duane C. Johnson Designer \ \ / \ / |
    1825 Florence St Heliostat,Control,& Mounts |
    White Bear Lake, Minnesota === \ / \ |
    USA 55110-3364 === \ |
    (651)426-4766 use Courier New Font \ |
    (my email: address) \ |
    http://www.redrok.com (Web site) ===
     
  14. Then how does heat travel through empty space?

    How does heat from the sun reach the earth?
     
  15. Then how does heat travel through empty space?

    How does the sun's heat reach the earth?
     
  16. Then how does heat travel through empty space?

    How does the sun's heat reach the earth?
     
  17. Then how does heat travel through empty space?

    How does heat from the sun reach the earth?
     
  18. In sci.physics, Anomaly Magnetism
    <>
    wrote
    The same way light does: E-M transverse wave propagation.
    Or quasi-corpuscular photons, if you prefer.

    Or has someone not heard of "infrared heat"? (The term is
    slightly redundant.)

    I've not heard specifically of a HASER but the idea is logical enough.
    AIUI, infrared lasers are fairly common.
     
  19. DonJan

    DonJan Guest

    Radiant flux travels through space, is absorbed by a material and the
    effect on material is called heat ...
     
  20. Sorry for the multiple posts.
     
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