Connect with us

tft always in standby mode

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Apr 16, 2006.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Guest

    My Dell 2000FP 20" TFT has some problem with the control circuits. It
    started out as a temperature-related problem - if the monitor had been
    switched on for say 30 mins and I switched it off and then on again, it
    would get stuck in its boot-sequence or lock in standby mode. Ok again
    after cooling down.

    Recently (as I guess is expected) it stopped working and is now always
    in this "half-booted" mode with the power LED lit as if in standby
    mode.
    Anyway, after some phone calls I discovered that Dell doesn't repair
    monitors, and neither do the generic repair companies ("we don't have a
    service agreement with Dell or with Dell parts").

    So, I have now opened the monitor up myself looking for evident stuff
    like burned caps and such - none found, but yeees there are many chips
    and micro-components in there! But while doing this I saw that several
    of the circuit boards are branded Acer.

    My question to you pros is what would be my best shot; trying to find
    an Acer technician, try to find Acer parts and replace boards myself,
    bin the monitor, ...?

    Cheers
    Mike
     
  2. Guest

    Maybe try a can of component cooler on parts until you find the
    part/area that is faulty. My $0.02.

    -Brian
     
  3. JANA

    JANA Guest

    In these monitors I have been sometimes lucky and found capacitors reading
    high in ESR. You will need an ESR meter to test them. You can purchase SMD
    type capacitors from most of the major electronics parts suppliers. You will
    need a proper soldering iron and good soldering skills to change any of
    these caps.

    Farther than that, would not be possible do service at home. The warranty
    service people change the boards to fix these monitors.

    --

    JANA
    _____


    My Dell 2000FP 20" TFT has some problem with the control circuits. It
    started out as a temperature-related problem - if the monitor had been
    switched on for say 30 mins and I switched it off and then on again, it
    would get stuck in its boot-sequence or lock in standby mode. Ok again
    after cooling down.

    Recently (as I guess is expected) it stopped working and is now always
    in this "half-booted" mode with the power LED lit as if in standby
    mode.
    Anyway, after some phone calls I discovered that Dell doesn't repair
    monitors, and neither do the generic repair companies ("we don't have a
    service agreement with Dell or with Dell parts").

    So, I have now opened the monitor up myself looking for evident stuff
    like burned caps and such - none found, but yeees there are many chips
    and micro-components in there! But while doing this I saw that several
    of the circuit boards are branded Acer.

    My question to you pros is what would be my best shot; trying to find
    an Acer technician, try to find Acer parts and replace boards myself,
    bin the monitor, ...?

    Cheers
    Mike
     
  4. Guest

    Hi Brian, the monitor doesn't function even when cool any longer, but
    you reckon that the broken component will function if made really cool?
    (I might start with putting the monitor outside for an hour or so, only
    +5C here ;-)
    Any suggestions on which components are usually temp related and which
    are not (to avoid unnecessary tests)? Chips, caps, ...?
    Thanks/Mike
     
  5. Guest

    Hi JANA,
    Ok, sounds interesting. And have you seen this on monitors with the
    kind of problems I'm having? (Ie, is a broken cap a probable cause?)
    Well, that was one of the tricky parts as Dell doesn't sell parts for
    their monitors, not to anyone. Is it easier to get parts for Acer
    monitors and/or can I assume that my Dell monitor is an Acer design
    from top to bottom, or did Acer just produce the boards according to
    Dell specs...?

    Thanks/Mike
     
  6. JANA

    JANA Guest

    I cannot answer the question about the product relationship between DELL and
    Acer. I know that DELL subcontracts to many of the big monitor manufactures
    for their monitors, as like all their other devices. DELL themselves are not
    a manufacture.

    I found that with all these computer monitors, it is almost impossible to
    buy original parts or service manuals for them.

    The most common cause of failures with these monitors are capacitors going
    high in ESR. The surface mount capacitors are available from Digikey, and
    other suppliers like them. You will have to know the size number, the
    microfarads, and the voltage rating of the ones you need in order to place
    an order. Or, you can get their catalogue, and try to identify the
    capacitors yourself.

    If the monitor is used with defective caps, eventually this may lead to
    other failures. Also, with age other types of components can start failing,
    which leads to an unreliability factor after some time.

    As for most of the IC's and non generic types of components in these
    monitors, they will be impossible to purchase from any of the electronics
    parts suppliers. The manufactures of these components will not sell directly
    to anyone who is not the contractor who made the original purchase.

    The manufactures of these monitors do not service any of their monitors at
    the component level. They put in new boards, and then re-calibrate using an
    interface system that connects to the monitor.

    After warranty, most of these monitors do not pay to service, unless it is a
    high end monitor that is very costly to replace.


    --

    JANA
    _____


    Hi JANA,
    Ok, sounds interesting. And have you seen this on monitors with the
    kind of problems I'm having? (Ie, is a broken cap a probable cause?)
    Well, that was one of the tricky parts as Dell doesn't sell parts for
    their monitors, not to anyone. Is it easier to get parts for Acer
    monitors and/or can I assume that my Dell monitor is an Acer design
    from top to bottom, or did Acer just produce the boards according to
    Dell specs...?

    Thanks/Mike
     
  7. Guest

    Thanks for your detailed reply JANA!
    Well that sounds promising!
    An equivalent monitor is priced from around $600. Do you have any idea
    in what price range a replacement board would be, in case I would find
    a match among Acer's parts?
    (So I don't waste time looking for a part that will be too expensive
    anyway...)

    Cheers
    Mike
     
  8. My Dell 2000FP 20" TFT has some problem with the control circuits. It
    Stick it in your freezer for at least 12 hours, see if it comes up OK.
    If not, toss it. If it does, ;-) , just don't turn it off.
     
  9. Dave

    Dave Guest

    For boards, lcdpart.com sells inverter boards and Norris Parts on eBay sells
    logic boards. I've worked with them and they are both pretty solid. If I
    were in your shoes, I'd buy a working cracked screen monitor of the same
    model on eBay and swap in the good boards. I've purchased cracked screen
    monitors for as low as $15 just to get the working boards and the backlite
    bulbs.

    Maybe its just a coincidence but I'm starting to see a number of 2000fp's on
    eBay that just "died" or have other circuit related problems. That might be
    a signal to stock up on boards or to just trade up to something newer. Or
    it might not. ;-)

    Dave
     
  10. Guest

    For boards, lcdpart.com sells inverter boards and Norris Parts on eBay sells
    That was very useful info - great! Looking at Norris' failure
    descriptions on eBay I now know that it is my logic board that is
    broken. Couldn't find any broken monitors on eBay right now so might go
    for one of Norris's boards.
    THAT was very interesting info. It will for sure influence my decision
    whether to fix or ditch this unit...

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  11. Guest

    Stick it in your freezer for at least 12 hours, see if it comes up OK.
    Actually not a bad idea. Just for curiosity; why such a long time? (I
    just looove scientific explanations ;-).
     
  12. Just for curiosity; why such a long time

    If it is, as the other posts suggest, high leakage electrolytics, then you want the electrolytics'
    electrolyte paste to be completely chilled. Since this is aqueous, dense paste it has a relatively
    high heat capacity and at best only moderate heat conductance. 12 hours is usually ong enough to
    complete freeze chicken pieces, so it should be more than adequate for electrolytics, none of which
    in such a device should be as big as chicken parts. Now if it were old DEC power supplies, for example,
    I'd suggest longer, they often had electrolytics as big or bigger than a 40mm round, which would have
    longer characteristic cooling times.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-