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Testing Projector Lamp with CCFL Tester?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by warf135, May 7, 2012.

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  1. warf135

    warf135

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    May 21, 2011
    I''m just wondering if it would be possible to test a projector lamp with a CCFL tester.

    My thinking is, that a projector lamp uses a high voltage to create an arc and light up the high pressure gas inside, and my CCFL tester puts out a high voltage and is probably strong enough to make an arc (its capable of lighting 42" CCFL's)

    The only problem i can think of is (from what i read) that the projectors lighting circuit starts at a high voltage to create the arc, and then reduces the voltage to a lower level. the CCFL tester is constant voltage.

    Personally i don't think the projector lamp is blown (as i could not detect voltage at its connector) so i don't wanna buy a new lamp for £150 and then find its a fault with the lighting circuit. So it would be handy if i could test the lamp somehow...

    Anyone know if the CCFL tester idea would work? -Cheers, Norm.
     
  2. john monks

    john monks

    693
    1
    Mar 9, 2012
    When you say a projector bulb I'm assuming you mean a xenon lamp. A typical xenon lamp operates from about 15 to 45 volts @ about 50 amps. The starting voltage is from about 20KV to 50KV. A cfl operates around 900 volts @ about 27mA and has a starting voltage of not much more than 1KV. So the short answer is no. The only think I can think of is to make a 45KV pulse inductive kick pulse generator and see if the lamp flashes.
     
  3. warf135

    warf135

    28
    0
    May 21, 2011
    Thanks for the reply John, I'm not sure which technology the projector lamp is, it could well be a xenon lamp. All i know is a replacement one is £LOTS OF MONEY! (The projector is a Philips bSure SV2 LC3132)

    I had thought my CCFL tester was putting out about 32kv but i must be wrong then :-( nevermind.

    I'm 99% sure that the lamp is ok, so i'll investigate the circuit board that powers it and see what i find.
     
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