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Testing physics - elementary particles can became other particles?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Glenn, Aug 18, 2013.

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  1. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    (answer is sent to sci.physics )

    Some time it occurred to me, that this equation seems not to be sane?
    Please explain why it is ok:

    d-kvark -> electron + antineutrino + u-kvark

    How can the elementary particle d-kvark become/transform into three
    other elementary particles?

    -

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muon#Muon_decay
    Quote: "...
    μ− → e− + νe + νμ

    μ+ → e+ + νe + νμ
    ...."

    Again can elementary particles can become/transform into three other
    elementary particles?

    -

    What is wrong? Is it a fundamental secret physics prank, that I missed
    in college?:

    Elementary particle:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elementary_particle
    Quote: "...
    In particle physics, an elementary particle or fundamental particle is a
    particle unknown to have substructure, thus unknown to be composed of
    other particles.[1]
    []
    Known elementary particles include the fundamental fermions (quarks,
    leptons, antiquarks, and antileptons), which generally are "matter
    particles" and "antimatter particles", as well as the fundamental bosons
    (gauge bosons and Higgs boson), which generally are "force particles".[1]
    ...."

    /Glenn
     
  2. Bill Sloman

    Bill Sloman Guest

    Obviously.
    Since elementary particles can appear - in matched pairs with their anti-particle by "vacuum fluctuation" - it's not hard to see how an elementary particle might transform into three elementary particles when the two extra particels are a particle/anti-particle pair.

    If your physics teachers didn't tell you about this, they weren't doing much of a job. I think the idea goes back to Dirac, around 1930

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antiparticle

    where he invented anti-particles to solve a theoretical problem. Once he'd invented the positron, it took two years for somebody to find one.
     
  3. My high-school physics teacher (who'd just finished a PhD in quantum
    physics) use to say:

    "In nuclear physics, anything will do anything if you pay it enough"

    :)
     
  4. Phil Hobbs

    Phil Hobbs Guest

    That's the nuclear version of Schawlow's Law: "Anything will lase if you
    hit it hard enough."

    Cheers

    Phil Hobbs

    --
    Dr Philip C D Hobbs
    Principal Consultant
    ElectroOptical Innovations LLC
    Optics, Electro-optics, Photonics, Analog Electronics

    160 North State Road #203
    Briarcliff Manor NY 10510 USA
    +1 845 480 2058

    hobbs at electrooptical dot net
    http://electrooptical.net
     
  5. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Hi!

    ben6993 could you or others show other models - or the preon model decay
    for the muon. Or better yet - a web page with many decay examples?

    -

    Answers got so far - thanks.



    On 19/08/13 14.42, Odd Bodkin wrote:
    ....

    On 18/08/13 22.00, Bill Sloman wrote:
    ....
    anti-particle by "vacuum fluctuation" - it's not hard to see how an
    elementary particle might transform into three elementary particles when
    the two extra particels are a particle/anti-particle pair.
    doing much of a job. I think the idea goes back to Dirac, around 1930
    he'd invented the positron, it took two years for somebody to find one.
    On 18/08/13 22.43, Sam Wormley wrote:
    ....

    /Glenn
     
  6. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    (answer is sent to sci.physics )

    On 20/08/13 20.30, Glenn wrote:
    ....
    Hi ben6993 and others

    How is

    -

    W- = du'

    transformed to or from:

    W- = e- + ν'

    -

    and

    W+ = d'u

    transformed to or from:

    W+ = e+ + ν

    ?

    /Glenn
     
  7. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    What was your answer - and what is the right answer?

    /Glenn
     
  8. Glenn

    Glenn Guest

    Thanks, I am puzzled.

    Is there any web pages/references that explain the preon model as you did?

    /Glenn
     
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