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Temperature Control SSR Help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Logan Nichols, Nov 25, 2015.

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  1. Logan Nichols

    Logan Nichols

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    Nov 25, 2015
    Hello people!

    I was hoping someone could help me with solid state relay selection. I am in the process of building a control box for a fancy electro-melt spinner 3D printer. I need to be able to heat a heating element up to a certain temperature in order to melt the polymer.

    I have the novus N1020 temperature controller:
    https://oceancontrols.com.au/datasheet/nov/noc301_n1020_manual.pdf

    and the MCBC1225DF SSR:
    http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/93/m_cbc-35783.pdf

    My hope, was to use the 5V logical pulse from the n1020 temperature controller to switch a 26VAC load (which heats the element) using this relay. I have been unable to get the relay to trigger correctly (output signal doesn't flash, indicating the analogue signal < threshold), perhaps because the controller is outputting a pulse rather than dc?

    Does anyone have advice as to how to fix this, or suggest a suitable SSR to work with the pulse?

    Would be super appreciated!
     
  2. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
    665
    Jun 20, 2015
    There is not enough info on the temp. controller "logic pulse".
    To turn it to a constant "1" logic signal you can use the out2 of the controller like so.

    temp-control.jpg
     
    Arouse1973 likes this.
  3. Logan Nichols

    Logan Nichols

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    Nov 25, 2015
    Thank you, I agree!

    The issue with doing this is using the mechanical relay on the temp controller. Reliability is a key factor with this design, and the purpose of using the SSR was to get an unlimited amount of switches rather than have the mechanical relay fail at some time!

    Don't know what the best option here is!
     
  4. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015

    I know,
    You should take into account the fact that the controller's relay contacts will switch a very low current(mAs).Thus it will have a very long life.

    If you like to use the "pulse" output ,you should get the complete info about it's operation.
    Try contacting the controllers manufacturer for that.
     
  5. Logan Nichols

    Logan Nichols

    6
    0
    Nov 25, 2015
    Thank you for that, your help is really appreciated. One question, the particular model I have uses an input of 4-20mA (rather than 5v) in order to trigger the switch (the D model). Would the circuit you drew be suitable for this?
     
  6. Logan Nichols

    Logan Nichols

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    0
    Nov 25, 2015
    Nvm, realised pretty quickly how silly that question was
     
  7. dorke

    dorke

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    Jun 20, 2015
    No such thing as a silly question here...;)
    Can you make a drawing of the exact way you connected the devices?
    possibly add clear photos as well.
     
  8. GPG

    GPG

    452
    66
    Sep 18, 2015
    As far as can see, (is there an acronym for that?) You have a controller that will do PID connected to a proportional switch You have to take the 5V output with a ~ 27Ω resistor to drive 20mA to the input of the SSR making the SSR on/off. making sure that it is enabled, Or make an integrator to drive the SSR. Or get an SSR that is just on/off. The latter is my pick. Or use a opto triac driver and triac (Probably cheaper) if you are confident of doing so. edit: And common control grounds
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2015
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