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Switching power supply

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Christopher Alexandre, May 23, 2016.

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  1. Christopher Alexandre

    Christopher Alexandre

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    May 23, 2016
    Hi i have a switching power supply 12v 30a (360w) if i adjut it at 10v will it be able to supply 36a? For more info when i ask it to much amp (on 12v) the voltage drop to have a maximum power of 360w. Thanks. So, to resume if i adjust it at 10v will it be able to supply 36 amps ?
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there
    welcome to EP

    possibly it would be OK
    getting a spec sheet for the supply would be the best confirmation, anything else would be a guess


    Dave
     
  3. Christopher Alexandre

    Christopher Alexandre

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    May 23, 2016
    Thank you! I dont a the spec sheet... I have an other question: when i turn the screw to adjust the voltage what do i adjust? A resistor? Thanks
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    yes it is adjusting a variable resistor but that VR is just a part of a larger voltage control circuit
     
    Christopher Alexandre likes this.
  5. Christopher Alexandre

    Christopher Alexandre

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    May 23, 2016
    Ok i understand! So to know if it s able to supply 36 amp i have to know if the resistance of the cicuit goes down when the viltage goes down.

    If not the heat will be to hige because of p=ri2 so
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    There are two limits for your power supply, 12V and 30A. Going beyond either of these could lead to trouble. The internal components will have voltage and current limits. You may be able to get away with a few more amps if cooling is very good but you are skating on thin ice and the high current components are expensive.
     
  7. Alec_t

    Alec_t

    2,970
    805
    Jul 7, 2015
    I agree with duke37. The internal components are unlikely to be rated for 36A. In particular, the inductor may saturate if the current is greater than 30A. That could lead to catastrophic failure of the supply.
     
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