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Switching a RF signal

Discussion in 'Radio and Wireless' started by atom78, Aug 20, 2018.

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  1. atom78

    atom78

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    Aug 20, 2018
    Hey guys,

    I need to switch a 400-690 MHz signal. The signal is received in an antenna and go through the coaxial cable. The idea is switch the signal, turning it on and off (letting it pass or not) as necessary. I´m using a microcontroller, and I think in doing it with an optoacoupler or a transistor as switch. Anyone know some model of this components that can work well at this level of frequency?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Ylli

    Ylli

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    Jun 19, 2018
    I'd suggest a Minicircuits part. So my post to you in the other forum,
     
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  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Hi ya
    welcome to EP :)


    optocoupler or transistor, no

    firstly what power level ??


    agreed, mini-circuits do have some good UHF and microwave switches


    https://www.minicircuits.com/WebStore/Switches.html


    Dave
     
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  4. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    What about the KISS principle and a simple RF coaxial relay?
     
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  5. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    May 20, 2017
    Agree with Kelly_eye. Did something similar many years ago switching multiple sources into one receiver. Coax in Coax out. Works a treat with minimal losses or signal corruption.
     
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  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    unless a small on PCB solution is needed ;) ;)
     
  7. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    May 20, 2017
    Depends on how much degradation you are prepared to put up with.
     
  8. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    OP states that it is a signal from an aerial
    ..where either very low levels (receive) are concerned or higher levels (transmit) are to be dealt with. In either circumstance the best i.e. lowest loss device will be a relay.
     
  9. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    Absolutely.
     
  10. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    you both still missed the possible point hahaha

    where the signal comes from is irrelevent

    it's still not established whether the relay needs to be PCB or otherwise mounted
     
  11. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009

    so how about returning to your thread and tell us all the details !! :)
     
  12. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    I've looked at some of the data sheets for the solid state devices - many (most) are 5mm2 and have 0.5mm pin pitch :eek:..... these would require special(ist) pcb manufacture/design and/or mounting/servicing tools.

    Whilst I don't object to using them (horses for courses) I did specify the KISS principle and mounting a small relay off board with suitable plug-in connectors would be pretty 'simple' - making my KISS principle quite valid.

    But, yes, let's hear from the OP........
     
  13. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    Agree with you. Relays on a pcb would require transmission lines for proper integration. Ok if you know how to design them correctly.
    Like you, I have always subscribed to the KISS principle. For those who may not be familiar with the acronym it means Keep It Simple Stupid.
     
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