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supply voltage

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by qurat1995, Sep 13, 2019.

  1. qurat1995

    qurat1995

    2
    0
    Sep 13, 2019
    I have designed a circuit with 4 bit comparator. Now, I need a comparator IC that can operate on the supply voltage 1.8-3.3 volts. I have seen datasheet of a few ICs but got confused in two Supply voltage ranges. For example, MC14585B is a 4 bit comparator. Can anyone look at the datasheet attached and tell what is the supply voltage range? voltage.PNG
     
  2. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

    2,307
    649
    Jun 10, 2015
    The normal operating voltage range is 3 V to 18 V. The absolute maximum ratings are the levels at which damage to the chip can occur. So at 2 V the chip is not warranted to work correctly, but it is warranted not to be destroyed.

    ak
     
  3. Nanren888

    Nanren888

    126
    26
    Nov 8, 2015
    Generally the initial list tells you the normal ranges for various things, including the supply range.
    The "Maximum ratings" or sometimes "Absolute maximum ratings" is explained by thes line at the bottom of the table.

    Stresses exceeding Maximum Ratings may damage the device. Maximum
    Ratings are stress ratings only. Functional operation above the Recommended
    Operating Conditions is not implied. Extended exposure to stresses above the
    Recommended Operating Conditions may affect device reliability.

    That is, these are the maximum that can be applied without significant risk of damage. They are not operating conditions.
    .
    Some devices, moreover have one-time ratings that they can survive, but only once.
    .
    So under normal operation this device expects the supply to be between 3.0 and 18 volts.
    Sorry, not down to 1.8 volts.
    BTW. That's a really wide range for the supply of any one circuit.
     
  4. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

    2,307
    649
    Jun 10, 2015
    Maybe in the 60's, but it's been the standard CMOS logic voltage range for over 50 years.

    ak
     
  5. Nanren888

    Nanren888

    126
    26
    Nov 8, 2015
    Having written that, I did wonder whether anyone would take it that way.
    Yes, but standard, that's not a circuit.
    I mean it's a standard for the components, but unless the circuit is all the same technology, my guess was the majority of circuits made from such flexible components, were designed to run on a nominal voltage, or narrower range.
    If qurat1995 is designing a very general circuit that can be connected in many places, interfacing to actual other circuits running with nominal supply voltages anywhere between 1.8 and 3 volts, sure. But if he/she's designing just one circuit for one application, then design for such a wide range might add to the complexity of the design, for someone who is not yet a master.
    .
    Happy if you disagree. Just wanted to offer the idea of narrow may be easier, in case it was useful to qurat1995.
    .
    You are correct, of course, I remember a few things from the 60's. For some of us, this is not an insult. :)
     
  6. qurat1995

    qurat1995

    2
    0
    Sep 13, 2019
    thank you, I got it clear.
     
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