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Supply Voltage vs Voltage Rating

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Anon Email, Sep 25, 2008.

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  1. Anon Email

    Anon Email Guest

    I have a speaker which is rated at 100V, yet the supply voltage is
    115V. The speaker works fine. What's the deal?

    Cheers,

    Anon
     
  2. Bob

    Bob Guest

    It is good that you put this in the basics group where it belongs

    What system is this part of?

    Hifi loudspeakers are usually rated by power and impedance.
    Loudspeakers for public address systems are usually
    "100volt line" types.

    A loudspeaker is driven by an amplifier.
    Inside the amplifer the AC mains electricity is
    converted to DC, typically in the region of 50volts.
    The average output voltage of the amplifier varies
    with the volume of the sound that the system is
    producing.
    There is no direct relationship between the
    voltage of the mains electricity supply and
    the voltage produced by the amplifier.

    Bob
     
  3. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Bob"
    Anon Email

    ** The OP has a powered speaker - likely Chinese.

    On the back it says 100V cos it is made for Japan or other place with that
    power voltage.

    Probably got it on eBay.


    ..... Phil
     
  4. neon

    neon

    1,325
    0
    Oct 21, 2006
    he probably have a speaker with 115v ac input to run the amp.
     
  5. Anon Email

    Anon Email Guest

    On the back it says 100V cos it is made for Japan or other place with that
    No, I bought it in Japan when I was there, and took it home with me. I
    bought a transformer which transforms from 240V (I'm in Australia), to
    115V. I couldn't find a transformer that transforms down to 100V
    specifically. The speaker works fine at 115V. Am I likely to blow the
    speaker if I up the volume too much?

    Japan is a bit weird, they have voltage supply at 100V, but the
    current frequency is 50 or 60 Hz depending on the region. From what
    I've read on the Internet, a difference of about 15% in the supply
    voltage is OK, and the current frequencies will not affect equipment
    that's not sensitive. I also noticed that the desktop computer I used
    to use in Japan was rated at 115V - I was curious as to why this
    didn't blow the power supply. Am I right about the 15% acceptability
    range, or was that incorrect info?

    Cheers,

    Anon
     
  6. neon

    neon

    1,325
    0
    Oct 21, 2006
    These days it is not unusual to have the P.S. with 115-240V AC input same things for 50hz and 60hz. now by putting a tranforfer to stepdown it can cause problem if it is 50 hz as opposed to 60hz you will need a 50hz transformer or a overated 60hz transformer for the same load. 50hz needs more iron as opposed to 60hz. as far as 100v or 115 120v ac nothing will blow up if it is in that range. a P.S. is allways design for at least +/- 20v. military insists on 80v and still function there goes efficiency.
     
  7. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Anon Email"
    No, I bought it in Japan when I was there,


    ** What a PITA prick you are for not saying that originally.


    I bought a transformer which transforms from 240V (I'm in Australia),
    to 115V. I couldn't find a transformer that transforms down to 100V
    specifically. The speaker works fine at 115V. Am I likely to blow the
    speaker if I up the volume too much?


    ** Go ahead - make MY day ...............


    Japan is a bit weird,


    ** So would you be

    - if someone dropped two fucking nukes on you.


    they have voltage supply at 100V, but the
    current frequency is 50 or 60 Hz depending on the region.


    ** Depends where the nukes landed - dickhead.


    From what
    I've read on the Internet, a difference of about 15% in the supply
    voltage is OK, and the current frequencies will not affect equipment
    that's not sensitive.


    ** Yawnnnnnn ....

    It don't matter - if it don't matter ....


    I also noticed that the desktop computer I used
    to use in Japan was rated at 115V - I was curious as to why this
    didn't blow the power supply.


    ** Huh ???

    Totally off with the pixies....


    Am I right about the 15% acceptability
    range, or was that incorrect info?


    ** Is your prick +/- 15% compared to the next guy's ??

    Enquiring minds need to know......




    ...... Phil
     
  8. Anon Email

    Anon Email Guest

    Isn't it funny how the Internet always leads people to talk to each
    other in the vernacular known as Verbal Diarrhoea. Thanks for your
    help on the first question, Phil, as for the second...VD.
     
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