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Summary of ways people fixed their Nikon Coolpix camera battery door latch

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Jeanette Guire, Oct 19, 2007.

  1. Here is a summary review of ways people fixed their Nikon Coolpix battery
    door latches when they invariably broke. Nikon would recommend replacing
    the entire camera body.

    However, innovative homeowners have fixed Nikon's engineering flaw using
    - duct tape to hold the Nikon Coolpix battery door shut
    - pinned & screwed the Nikon Coolpix to hold the door shut
    - paperclipped the Nikon Coolpix cameras to replace the plastic latch
    - tripodded the Nikon Coolpix to hold the battery door shut

    Here is a photo of the Nikon Coolpix camera body BEFORE it breaks
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonCP3100/Images/battcompartment.jpg

    Here is a photo of Nikon Coolpix camera body ultimately broken
    http://files.myopera.com/mcduret/blog/IMGP0065b.JPG

    Here a user fixed the Nikon Coolpix camera body with a paperclip
    http://www.uthunter.com/images/Nikonfix.jpg

    Here a user fix the Nikon Coolpix camera with a tripod
    http://files.myopera.com/mcduret/blog/IMGP0070b.JPG

    Here is how I fixed the Nikon Coolpix 3100 camera with epoxy
    http://usera.imagecave.com/coolpixfixer/

    Here is a photo of how Nikon fixed the flaw themselves
    http://www.scaredpoet.com/images/E7600_batterydoor.jpg

    I'll post a review of some of the other innovative solutions I've found
    searching for a solution for my nikon coolpix camera with the notorious
    Nikon engineering flaws.
     
  2. http://www.photoprojects.net/index6.html

    Nikon CP-990 Door Latch Fix: The battery compartment door latches are metal
    on plastic. I was very careful of mine because of that, but it finally gave
    out. My camera is old and not used very much so I decided to build a
    retaining bracket to hold the door closed. I made a few out of cardboard
    until I found what I wanted and then transferred it to 1/8 " aluminum. The
    feet on the bottom allow the camera to sit upright on the shelf. * * * * I
    took Tom's advice and modified my camera. I drilled a .073" hole into the
    front of the battery compartment where the plastic tab broke off. Then
    forced a small screw through the hole to serve as a door latch retainer.
    Then used a Dremel cut off wheel to cut off the excess length. Retouched it
    with a sharpie just like Toms. Thanks again Tom.
     
  3. Looks like the Nikon Coolpix 990 has a aimilar battery latch door broken
    problem.


    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2002 23:01:49 -0000
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Fri, 29 Nov 2002 22:58:09 +0000

    Any ideas to bodge this problem ?, a broken battery
    flap. The plastic lugs have broken off in the battery
    compartment, seems to be part of the case.

    I don't want to pay Nikon repair costs so at the moment
    I'm using a self tapper thro' the flap into the middle
    of the battery case... don't know how long this will last
    tho.

    Have thought of an external battery like the Samsung
    LiON.

    Chris

    From: (WMAS 1960)
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Date: 30 Nov 2002 09:18:43 GMT
    References: <>
    Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com
    Subject: Re: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Message-ID: <>

    I am one who divised a plate that fits on the bottom of the camera as you
    discribe. It really isn't that much of a hastle. I will say it didn't
    work out as nicely as I had envisioned. I thought that if I simply
    loosened the bolt I could turn the plate enough to have the door open.
    That didn't work out. The door, on my design, will not fully open enough
    to change batteries. I do have to remove the plate. However, if you are
    not constantly replacing batteries it works fairly nicely.

    This is how I did it.

    I took a piece of metal that I got at home depot. It was a piece of
    galvanized metal that would be used to join two pieces of wood together.
    It was a plate about 5" x 5" or so. It might have been intended to join
    2x6s(?) Anyways it is a metal plate that had a couple spikes in it and
    holes where you might drive some nails or screws. I took a Sharpie and
    traced the bottom of my camera(around the handle to the tripod bolt) onto
    the piece of metal and using a hacksaw cut out the piece of metal. I then
    used a file and cleaned up the edges and filed the plate until it fealt to
    be a good fit to the shape of the camera. I used the file also to knock
    off corners and edges so that it had a dull finished edge that would be
    safe and not cause cuts. You could then paint the plate black so that it
    matches the camera. Or, as I did, use some of the rubber dip that you can
    dip tools in to put rubber grips on. I did that and it looked great and
    worked very well. However the rubber did eventually wear off the edges of
    the plate and I now have to dip it again. I have just left it bare for
    now. Less hastle.

    Once I had this nice little plate I found a bolt from an old camera case.
    The kind of case that would screw on your camera and snap over it. This
    bolt fits in the tripod socket and has a thread in the bottom so that you
    can attach it to a tripod if needed. This allows you to install the plate
    and still have use of a tripod socket. I had to use a washer with my bolt
    as it still had some play when fully screwed into the socket. I guess it
    takes up the space that the thickness of the leather camera case used to
    occupy.

    I would point out that you will want to bend the plate slightly upward,
    toward the camera bottom. With the plate totally flat, it would not hold
    the door completely shut. The pressure of the batteries would push down
    enough, sometimes, to loose contact. By bending the plate, into a very
    slight bow, you compensate for that force. While the batteries are pushing
    pressure down, the bowing form of the plate is pushing back up.

    I now have a D100 that I have started to use most of the time. Therefore
    my CP990 sits around a lot. I still use it for travel when the more
    cumbersome SLR would be a nuissance and when I am out observing with my
    telescope. It is much lighter weight and fits onto a telescope eyepiece
    very well. The CP990 also has it's value for quick snapshot things like
    documentation of property for damages or for insurance use... With more
    occasional use I use Lithium batteries in it and can put in a set of
    batteries and not have to change them for months. Therefore the removal
    and replacement of the plate is not that much of a problem. I looked into
    having my Coolpix fixed but was told that it would take weeks if not months
    to get it back and would cost a couple hundred dollars. The local Nikon
    service center told me that they can't fix it and would have to send it to
    New York(?). I figure it isn't worth it. My solution cost me about 15
    bucks and took me all of about an hour to fabricate. Say 2 hours including
    the time I spent in Home Depot.

    My camera had given me over 3000 pictures in it's livetime, so far, and
    asside from the battery door seems like it will easilly be able to give me
    hundreds or even thousands more. It still works great dispite the door
    latch problem.
     
  4. Subject: Re: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 11:12:11 +0000
    From: Adrian Chapman <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 11:12:12 +0000
    Lines: 30

    Exactly the same thing happened to me some weeks back. I enquired
    about the cost of a repair and was quoted 60 GBP which I though was
    rather expensive and won't cure what is a fundamental design flaw. In
    the end I repaired it myself, but you will need some small tools and a
    tube of good superglue together with something like some strands of
    fine glass fibre.

    This site
    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1007&message=2267289
    describes this repair, but also requires some dismantling of the
    camera. I managed to do it without any dismantling and so far the repair
    seems to be holding up and the repair is much easier to do than to
    describe.

    OK, it doesn't look very good, but it is inside the camera so not
    generally visible, but it will be considerably stronger than the
    original design.
     
  5. http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1007&message=2267289

    Forum Nikon Talk
    Subject 990 battery door repair instruction
    Posted by steve gardner [CLICK FOR PROFILE]
    Date/Time 7:44:28 AM, Monday, February 25, 2002 (GMT)


    I have used my 990 for overy 40 gig of aviation photographs in the past two
    years or so and I was getting pretty used to its working every time. This
    made it even more agrivating when I dropped the fresh charge into the
    battery compartment and found that the door would not close. Upon
    inspection I discovered that Nikon had made the battery door latch cleets
    out of plastic. Plain old everyday plastic like styrene or ABS and not an
    engineering plastic with nylon or carbon in it. What is more when you
    inspect the area where the failure occurs you can see that the door could
    have been cleeted by the outer shell, the Magneseum shell, which I expect
    would have been much more rugged. In any case you will be wanting to know
    how to get your 990 working again. You will need a good CA type glue, NOT
    superglue or anything from the hardware store, but ZAP or HOT STUFF or JET
    glue from the local hobby shop. These glues are sold for building RC model
    airplanes, but you will not be finding any better glue for camera repair
    anywhere. Next you will need some Kevlar thread, or some glass fiber
    bundles from very heavy glass cloth. My Kevlar thread comes from fishing
    line and is about 25 pound test and very thin. The glass cloth will render
    glass cords thin enough for this repair and pleanty strong.
    On to the repair:

    Remove the screws that hold the two metal shells to the grip side of the
    camera. Strangly enough you will not need to remove the rubber grip, I did
    and found no fasteners under it. There are two screws on each side of the
    pivot, three on the underside, two under the video out flap and one near
    the strap tunnel. The battery door needs to be open as well. Be careful
    once the shells are loose, the front shell has the mode/trigger switch and
    this is still attached to the camera by a flexcircuit. The speaker diaphram
    is also attached to the front shell and wired to the camera, but you can
    carefully peel it away from the shell and so help gain access to where you
    will need to go. This easily reataches with the stickum still in place.
    Once the shells are open you will see that there are two latches that fix
    the broken part to the rest of the plastic battery compartment. Using a
    very small pointed tool like a jewelers screwdriver you must unlatch these
    and so then remove the broken part.
    The repair itself:

    It will be obvious where the broken plastic is. If you are lucky the bits
    will still be there, just bend and cracked outward. Push them down and back
    into position and apply glue to the cracks. Do this by putting a drop of CA
    onto a smooth non absorbant surface and then using the eye of a sewing
    needle to pick the glue up. The glue will bead across the eye and so you
    can put just a very small amount right where youneed it If the bits that
    broke off are not present then you have to cut a CD jewel case apart to
    make new cleets. Check a friends 990 to see the needed shape. Glue into
    place. These reglued cleets will not hold for even one battery change as
    yet, we are about to bullet proof them. Take a length of thread, kevlar or
    glass, and using a super small bit of glue attach it down under the cleet
    inside of the battery hole. then wrap the thread over the top of the cleet
    and down the other side back into the battery hole. make sure that the
    thread is positioned very near the edge of the cleet so that is can take
    the latch loads and so hold the door closed. once you have a thread in
    place put a second across the first and then add CA glue in small amounts
    until the thread is saturated and a fillet of glue is showing around the
    thread. Now you have to cut / sand /file the end of the thread in the
    battery hole to allow the battery to fit into the shell. Trim as you need
    and do not worry, so long as there is a bit of Kevlar or glass running up
    across and back down the cleet it will never fail again. Reverse the steps
    needed to disassemble the camera being careful to reattach the speaker and
    not pinch any wires. Wait until the camera's shells are back together and
    test fit the door. You may have to trim the glue or plastic bits you built
    the cleets from to get the door to shut. Now you have two cleets with a
    pair of 25 pound reenforcment cords each holding the door shut against the
    battery springs. You may consider adding this reenforcment to a 990 that
    has not yet failed, it is much easier to get the cord into the proper place
    with the cleets still intact. NOTE: it is very possible to perform this
    repair without any disassembly at all if you are very very careful with the
    glue. I think that it is too easy to get the part out and be free to work
    to do it this way, but if you are shy about seeing the inside of your
    camera you can try it this way. Good luck and let me know how you like the
    fix.
    Steve Gardner
     
  6. Kris
    View profile
    More options Nov 30 2002, 8:06 am
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    From: "Kris" <>
    Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2002 15:09:47 -0000
    Local: Sat, Nov 30 2002 8:09 am
    Subject: Re: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Reply to author | Forward | Print | Individual message | Show original |
    Report this message | Find messages by this author
    Thanks for the tips, much appreciated.

    As well as the cheap / weak plastic lugs I am sure
    the pressure of the bent metal battery contacts has
    a lot to do with it, a friends Casio has spring contacts
    which aren't so strong and the flap shuts easily.

    Chris

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    WMAS 1960
    View profile
    I am not sure what you are referring to about bent metal contacts. At
    least in my situation that wasn't the case. Closely examining the
    situation when my door broke I found that everything was normal except the
    notch on the cameras frame where the latch catches. That very small
    plastic catch had snapped and the door simply would no longer lock in
    place. My understanding of the problem was that the 990 was designed where
    the batteries (because of the contacts and springs inside the compartment)
    were under so much pressure that the design of the catch was just not
    sufficient enough to hold the door over time. That is one reason why I
    figured that the metal plate was a better solution. I did try to glue the
    catch and looked at the fiberglass solution but that seemed way to
    intricate to me. You would need to take a knife and shred the glass fibers
    and lay them in place with some cement... Then there was the possibility
    that it would just happen again. The problem being that the pressure and
    stress is still on that catch. In fact the metal plate solution might be
    worth consideration for those who haven't even had their doors break yet.
    Properly built it will actually take some of that pressure and stress off
    of the catch and may also prevent what happened to me. At the least, it
    will prevent the door popping open on you during a shoot and can help you
    keep going. I was out observing with my telescope. It was a very cold
    night when the camera started to go on and off and act funny. A couple
    moments later I heard a rattling sound as the door FLEW open throwing all
    the batteries into the darkness. I suppose the cold weather might have
    played some roll in the latch breaking at that time. The plastic might
    have gotten a little too cold and brittle. Incidentally I have also seen
    similar problems mentioned with the 950 as well. I don't know if other
    Nikon cameras are also defective in this way.
    More options Nov 30 2002, 10:30 am
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    From: (WMAS 1960)
    Date: 30 Nov 2002 17:29:43 GMT
    Local: Sat, Nov 30 2002 10:29 am
    Subject: Re: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Reply to author | Forward | Print | Individual message | Show original |
    Report this message | Find messages by this author
    I am not sure what you are referring to about bent metal contacts. At
    least in
    my situation that wasn't the case. Closely examining the situation when my
    door broke I found that everything was normal except the notch on the
    cameras
    frame where the latch catches. That very small plastic catch had snapped
    and
    the door simply would no longer lock in place. My understanding of the
    problem
    was that the 990 was designed where the batteries (because of the contacts
    and
    springs inside the compartment) were under so much pressure that the design
    of
    the catch was just not sufficient enough to hold the door over time. That
    is
    one reason why I figured that the metal plate was a better solution. I did
    try
    to glue the catch and looked at the fiberglass solution but that seemed way
    to
    intricate to me. You would need to take a knife and shred the glass fibers
    and
    lay them in place with some cement... Then there was the possibility that
    it
    would just happen again. The problem being that the pressure and stress is
    still on that catch. In fact the metal plate solution might be worth
    consideration for those who haven't even had their doors break yet.
    Properly
    built it will actually take some of that pressure and stress off of the
    catch
    and may also prevent what happened to me. At the least, it will prevent
    the
    door popping open on you during a shoot and can help you keep going.

    I was out observing with my telescope. It was a very cold night when the
    camera started to go on and off and act funny. A couple moments later I
    heard
    a rattling sound as the door FLEW open throwing all the batteries into the
    darkness. I suppose the cold weather might have played some roll in the
    latch
    breaking at that time. The plastic might have gotten a little too cold and
    brittle.

    Incidentally I have also seen similar problems mentioned with the 950 as
    well.
    I don't know if other Nikon cameras are also defective in this way.

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    ajacobs2
    View profile
    More options Dec 1 2002, 5:48 am
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    From: "ajacobs2" <>
    Date: Sun, 01 Dec 2002 12:48:20 GMT
    Local: Sun, Dec 1 2002 5:48 am
    Subject: Re: Coolpix 990 battery flap broken
    Reply to author | Forward | Print | Individual message | Show original |
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    US Fix.
    OK, now that few ideas have rolled into the equation, lets look at a
    different way to go about this.
    If you fix the camera with the glue and the tabs and screws and what not
    you
    still risk the same problem again, so why bother. If you alter it and
    decide
    at a later date to repair it at Nikon (the only guys with parts for these
    things, your "screwed" as the bill will be larger for the other parts now
    being modified not working.
    I had this problem with the 950 and the 990. The battery cover is a weak
    spot because of the pressure of the springs.
    So, I took some silicon cement and closed the doors with a dab or two.
    Enough to close and easy enough to get off at a later date when they get
    repaired.
    I use my Jacobs battery packs for the two cameras and never went back to
    the
    batteries. I also use the same pack on my flashes, my bikes for night
    halogens, my GPS's and my field radios, two power remote radios for SARs.
    The plans are free and the parts are very easily available. Just go to
    my
    website and look under powerpacks. They are about four to six times more
    powerful than the cheap stuff in the yellow packages. Read my website for
    other battery answers....

    International Fix. (FAQ)
    Plan A:
    They do sell the Yuasa 4 amp- six volt batteries in at MDS in the UK . And
    I'm looking for a 6 V charger that operates on your voltage.

    Plan B:
    I suppose you still have the AA batteries. In the UK you must have a Radio
    Shack or similar type store.
    They make a 6 cell AA holder for the NiMH.
    Get two you want to put them in parallel so you get twice the longevity,
    otherwise any powerpack is a waste of money.
    Why six cells, simple 4 Nimh 0nly equal 4.8 volts. They don't make a five
    holder. So you go six.
    Five cells plus a dummy = 6 Volts ( Dummy cells are fake batteries,
    pictures on my site)
    The AC port on the Nikons take six volts.

    Plan C:
    Now for the 995 Nikon user. Six cells and you have 7.2 enough for a Nikon
    995. Only the charger is 8.4
    995 user can also use packs made for the RC cars we call them here.....

    Why two packs together? Simple....twice the longevity. If your batteries
    are 1800 NiMH x 2= 3600mah pack.
    Now you know how the big guys make claims about their super packs.....no
    brainer..
     
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    From: "Kris" <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    References: <b5l7dk$ulr$>
    Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 battery cover fault
    Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 22:03:18 -0000
    Lines: 32
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    NNTP-Posting-Date: Sun, 23 Mar 2003 21:55:25 +0000
    Hi Roy, don't despair this is happening to all of us 990 owners and , yes,
    it's a design fault.

    There are lots of threads on the NG' s about this and numerous articles
    like

    http://www.dpreview.com/forums/read.asp?forum=1007&message=2267289

    In my case I bought an external battery

    http://www.digitalfirst.co.uk/ProdSDetail.asp?cat=Accessories&ProdID=508

    also I made up a metal plate which is held in place with a screw into the
    tripod fixing
    works fine but never used it, I drilled right through the battery
    compartment into the centre
    of the holder with a fine drill and have been using a self tapper now for
    12
    battery
    changes and still OK, don't tighten too much and use a little silicone
    grease.
    When it gives up I'll get a bigger self tapper ! until the day I have to
    use
    the plate.

    Chris
     
  8. I have a nikon coolpix camera too, the L4.

    It has a little bit different and probably little bit stronger gray
    thingy/hole.

    However the plastic clippie might break off too, it doesn't look to strong.

    For now it's looking ok.

    Thanks for the warning though... I'll be extra carefull with it I swear LOL
    :D

    (I don't use the camera much though... but it's nice to have for the
    occasional event or spotting of ufo's ! LOL ;))

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  9. SMS

    SMS Guest

    Maybe you could get Nikon to put some of these up on their web site.
     
  10. Here's a new one - they fixed theirs with a brass staple to replace the
    plastic loop!



    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    From:
    Date: 15 Jun 2005 19:52:50 -0700
    Local: Wed, Jun 15 2005 7:52 pm
    Subject: Re: How to repair 1mm of latch plastic on Nikon CoolPix AA battery
    door

    It's risky (but what the heck, the camera is toast otherwise), but a
    stape is a good idea. The gap-toothed distance is about two millimeters
    so I'd need to locate a 2mm staple which I could then crazy glue in
    place after melting the access holes.

    It might work! If it does, you're a genius!
     
  11. That isn't a bad idea.

    Here's yet another solution. This person fixed their Nikon Coolpix camera
    with the broken battery latch using KEVLAR and CYANACRYLATE.

    I'm not sure how the "BOTTLE ROCKET" fixed the cyanacrylate outgassing -
    maybe someone who understands bottle rockets can explain.

    For those who have this problem with their Nikon Coolpix, read on.



    From: "ZeeExSixAre" <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Nikon CP990 update: it works!
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Thu, 29 Jul 2004 08:23:46 PDT
    Date: Thu, 29 Jul 2004 11:23:26 -0400

    Today I was taking pics of my Coolpix 990 to sell it. I got a few pics and
    wondered if I should show the battery compartment.

    The battery compartment has some crap in it... it has a broken latch that I
    fixed with kevlar thread and cyanoacrylate glue. I dremeled the excess
    when
    I made it and it works like a charm.

    The funny thing is, CA glue outgasses vapors like no tomorrow. The vapor
    deposit themselves all over the place. The same thing happens with your
    windshield when you buy a new car - the dashboard release agents that
    deposit themselves on your windshield as a hazy film.

    So the vapor outgassed all over my battery compartment, coating everything,
    including the battery contacts. I cleaned off the ones on the external
    door
    regularly, but I hadn't ever done anything for the ones deep in the camera.
    So I thought about it as I looked inside, and I said to myself, I should
    try
    cleaning the inside ones just to see if it will work.

    I grabbed a bottle rocket and swabbed the contacts on the inside, wiped the
    outside contacts again, threw in some batteries, and voilá! It works like
    new!

    I spent so much time without a camera just because of microns of outgassing
    deposits... Funny thing is, batteries were in the camera on the night that
    it died, so I can't imagine the deposits getting in between the battery and
    the contacts. Plus, I had switched in and out different sets of batteries,
    which should have scraped away at least enough to keep the camera
    working...

    So now I have two working digicams... I apologize for bad-mouthing Nikon.
    At least I can now sell the old one as working instead of dead, whoohoo!
     
  12. Here's yet another solution to the Nikon Coolpix battery latch problem.

    This person fixed their Nikon Coolpix battery door latch with something
    called a "roll pin".

    From: "Vance Green" <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Re: Battery door latch on Coolpix 990 broken AGAIN!
    Date: Sat, 9 Aug 2003 21:35:33 -0700

    From March of this year, another unhappy 990 user wrote:
    Yes. Mine broke.

    I put the camera on my drill press in a padded cross feed vice and drilled
    through from the front, coming out into the battery compartment right where
    the tab was... the idea is to have something there for the sliding tab on
    the battery compartment door to slide under and latch as it did with the
    crappy plastic tab.

    Small bit .75 or .8mm if I remember correctly. I had an assortment of tiny
    roll pins and sized the bit to a press fit for the pin. You could use any
    small diameter wire to do the same thing.

    I pushed the pin in from the front protruding into the battery compartment.
    I cut the pin off flush to the outside with a Dremel tool cutoff wheel and
    dabbed a bit of "Sharpie" black ink on the shiny metal. You have to look
    close to know it is there. All has been well since.

    Took longer to tell about than to do. If you do not have a drill press, I
    believe it could be done by hand if careful.

    Whoever the engineer at Nikon was that designed that stupid latch tab was a
    moron.

    Tom


    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ----------------------------------------
    I kept this as I own a 990 myself, and intend to do this very thing
    if it breaks on me...

    Hope you're the handy type ;-)
     
  13. This solution to the infamous Nikon Coolpix battery door latch broken
    problem was to use something called a "quick release shoe".

    I'm not sure what that is, but the next person with this problem (and there
    will be a next, and a next, and a next) - now can find all the solutions in
    a single posting.



    From: "F. D. Lewis" <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Re: Battery door latch on Coolpix 990 broken AGAIN!
    Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2003 13:34:03 +0700

    same thing happened on my 880. I found that if I attach the quick-release
    shoe from my tripod to the camera, it keeps the battery door shut. not
    quite a 'fix', but ...
     
  14. Here's a new Nikon Camera Review Coolpix Solutions method.
    This guy used "auto body filler", whatever that is, to fix his Nikon
    Cooolpix Camera.

    He says it's better than Bondo's method (who is Bondo?) so maybe someone
    who knows more about repairing nikon cameras can explain what Bondo's
    solution was. We'd like to fill in all the gaps here in our knowledge so
    the next person with a broken Nikon Coolpix Camera door latch has the
    solution all in one spot.



    From: "Ozymandius" <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Re: Battery door latch on Coolpix 990 broken AGAIN!
    Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 08:49:56 GMT
    NNTP-Posting-Host: 216.26.2.233
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Mon, 11 Aug 2003 01:49:56 PDT
    Organization: EarthLink Inc. -- http://www.EarthLink.net

    I had this sme thing happen on my cp990. I was able to repair the latch
    with
    some auto body filler (really) and patience. Sand the area above the broken
    latch to coarsen the plastic (better bite for the Bondo), add a tiny amount
    of filler, and hold the broken latch in place while the filler sets (about
    15 minutes). A second dose of Bondo may be necessary. Once the filler has
    fully cured, carefully file away the excess, so that the door will close
    and
    latch.
    Good luck
     
  15. Here is an EXCELLENT review of nikon coolpix camera reliability repairs.
    In this posting, the camera repair was to use FISHING LINE!


    From: (WMAS 1960)
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Date: 15 Jan 2004 22:26:44 GMT
    References: <>
    Organization: AOL http://www.aol.com
    Subject: Re: Nikon cp990 need help
    Message-ID: <>

    If you are referring to your battery door simply will not latch because of
    broken catches in the mechanism. This is a common problem due to the
    tension
    of the springs in the battery compartment and the stress that they put on
    the
    battery door by pressing the batteries under strong pressure. Especially
    in
    colder weather when the plastics can get brittle the door can snap open.
    The
    problem, as I noticed, is not so much the door or the latch but the little
    edges on the edge of the battery opening that will break. Thus the door
    has
    nothing to catch on to.

    I have posted a couple of posts about this before with a solution that I
    found
    using materials that I found at my local Home Depot. I wrote a few queries
    a
    few years ago when this happened to me one cold winter night while out
    shooting
    with my telescope. The cold single digit temps, I believe, made the
    plastic in
    the camera a little brittle and the door popped open. The camera started
    acting a little erradically then I herd a whisssssh as the batteries
    launced
    like little missiles into the cold black darkness. The solutions included
    sending to Nikon which could cost a couple hundred dollars and take as much
    as
    a month to get fixed. Or one solution mentioned using fishing line or
    something like that, fiberglass I think was mentioned also, and shredding
    it
    into fine strands. Then using some epoxy, or super glue to bind them and
    using
    surgical skills with a tweezers etc, rebuilding the catch.

    My solution was to make a plate that would fit to the bottom of the camera
    and
    bolt on using a tripod bolt that also had a socket for another tripod
    screw.
    This is the bolt that is commonly used on flash mounts or camera cases that
    bolt to the bottom of the camera then allow a tripod to be bolted to them.
    For
    more on this check this address....

    http://members.aol.com/wmas1960/homepages/CoolpixRepair2.htm

    Based on the frequency of this problem I decided to put this web page
    together
    this afternoon with some pictures of what I did. Hope it is helpful.

    You can also run a check on GOOGLE for Coolpix 990 Battery Door and
    probably
    find more info.

    My solution that I describe took me about an hour to fabricate and only
    cost
    about $15 not including tools and such that I didn't already have. I had
    to
    buy a hacksaw and a set of files. Actually only one file but the set was a
    better value. You might also want to get some fine sand paper to finish
    the
    edges a little more cleanly. I also tried getting some of the stuff that
    you
    would use to rubberize your tool handles. It worked fairly well and using
    the
    black color blended very well with the design of the camera. However, the
    rubber eventually wore off. You might consider simply painting the piece
    with
    black paint. I believe, since the metal I used was galvanized you might
    need
    to clean the metal piece with some vinegar or other good cleaner to remove
    any
    oils before paint will properly adhere.
     
  16. Guest



    Different camera, same problem, just used the handyman's secret
    weapon.


    Dave
     
  17. Here is an excellent set of photos of a Nikon camera repair for the
    notorious nikon battery catch broken problem

    http://members.aol.com/wmas1960/homepages/CoolpixRepair2.htm
    Last Updated: January 15, 2004 by

    These photographs show a solution to a common problem where the battery
    door on the Nikon Coolpix 990 pops open when the catch for the door latch
    breaks. Other solutions involve some extensive rebuilding of the battery
    compartment latch and may be more involved than an average person might
    feel comfortable. Other solutions include sending the camera back to Nikon
    for repairs which can take a bit of time and expense. This solution came to
    me as a more simple way of securing the door with the least amount of work
    possible.
     
  18. It looks like a LOT of Nikon cameras have this problem.
    Here is someone defending Nikon saying it's just a single camera.
    But, it seems to affect multiple cameras.
    Why do they make cameras with such flimsy battery door catches which break?


    From: Isaiah Beard <>
    Newsgroups: rec.photo.digital
    Subject: Re: Nikon CoolPix 3100 failed expectations for battery latch lock
    Date: Sat, 09 Jul 2005 09:33:07 -0400
    Organization: Posted via Supernews, http://www.supernews.com
    Message-ID: <>
    User-Agent: Mozilla Thunderbird 1.0.2 (Windows/20050317)
    X-Accept-Language: en-us, en
    MIME-Version: 1.0
    References: <LP4ze.1814$6%>
    <ta9ze.1232$>
    <5Faze.1847$6%>
    <>
    <xodze.27278$>
    <>
    <>
    In-Reply-To: <>
    Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
    Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    X-Complaints-To:
    Lines: 24


    I think you're jumping to conclusions a little too much. Basing your
    assessment of Nikon's quality based on a single product is a little
    presumptuous. Even the best designers and engineers make mistakes
    sometimes. And as I've illustrated, they seem to have learned from
    their mistake in similar designs going forward.

    Have you even tried contacting Nikon to see if they'll repair it?
     
  19. Joseph Gwinn

    Joseph Gwinn Guest

    Many years ago I had the battery door latch strike on an Olympus A16
    flash fail. My fix was to fashion a new strike out of 0.060" thick
    brass sheet, and to epoxy this piece of brass flat to the outside of the
    polystyrene flash body. The piece was about 1/2 by 3/8 inches, with a
    little ear off one corner acting as the strike. The 1/2 by 3/8 flat
    area was to give adequate gluing area. I used ordinary hardware store
    8-hour epoxy, had no problems with outgassing or melting plastic, and
    the brass piece never came loose.

    Joe Gwinn
     
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