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Strange voltage variation in circuit

Discussion in 'Audio' started by rahulb, Aug 1, 2019.

  1. rahulb

    rahulb

    41
    0
    Mar 14, 2018
    Hi,

    I made a circuit which turns on according to sounds. actually it toggles. One loud sound, it turns on and in the next, it turns off.

    When I measure voltage across the electret. it is around 6 v. I am using 9 volt battery for power which is producing around 8.5 volts.

    Now the problem is, in case of a loud sound, the voltage is increased to 6.3 to 6.4 v and it remains there. then, on next sound in comes back to 6 v. The voltage doesn't change until it receives next sound.

    I am not getting it what is going wrong? I am measuring voltage across the electret.

    thanks

    the circuit is below:

    clapsilk.png
     
  2. duke37

    duke37

    5,231
    718
    Jan 9, 2011
    Is this how it operates as you say or how it should work?

    Sound is a collection of AC signals, I think you will need a diode detector to give a voltage envelope when sound is detected.These envelopes can then be amplified by the 741 to trigger the 4027.
     
  3. aurelZ

    aurelZ

    63
    7
    Jun 10, 2019
    This circuit should be so called sound switch..right?
    So when sound comes then amplified signal from 741 trigg flipflop IC wihich must stay open to hold
    relay connected then next sound deactivati IC and relay is off,
    if your battery is old and cannot hold constant voltage then you have drops
    so try use new battery .
     
  4. Audioguru

    Audioguru

    2,598
    586
    Sep 24, 2016
    If you have an old 741 opamp that works when its power supply is only 9V (its datasheet shows only a 30V power supply) then almost any sound will cause it to have an AC output which will trigger the flipflop thousands of times.

    You need a "peak detector" circuit that produces a DC output corresponding to the peak or average amplitude of the sound and it can hold its voltage for a time that you decide. The peak detector can feed a comparator for you to select the loudness of the sounds that activate this circuit.
     
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