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Strange Screws

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Jan 16, 2006.

  1. Stephen

    Stephen Guest

  2. Rob B

    Rob B Guest

  3. mm

    mm Guest

    The tips that others have recommended were not available to the
    public, or at least not at a sufficiently low price, for quite a
    while after the screws came out. The same process will happen again
    and again.

    So.... Buy your self some left-handed drill bits and drill out the
    screws. You can do the same with right-handed drill bits, but it
    takes a lot more time. With LH, the bit acts as a screwdriver all the
    while it is drilling, and the receiving threads are usually good when
    you're done.

    Replace with other screws.

    There is one general tool vendor on the net that has LH screwdrivers,
    and the very big hardware store in Dallas (Eliot's, I think) had them
    when I was there.

    (It's fun to ask for them at big box stores, and even most hardware
    stores. They think it's a joke, like left-handed poker chips.

    Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
    me know if you have posted also.
     
  4. Rob B

    Rob B Guest

    no there is 5 pointer at bottom of the torx security page , sorry i posted
    too soon :}
     
  5. Odie Ferrous

    Odie Ferrous Guest

    Take them out, give them to a child to play with, and the child will be
    bleeding inside five minutes.


    Odie
     
  6. mc

    mc Guest

    Yes... you can actually hold the screw with the screwdriver... that is, put
    the screw on the end of the screwdriver, then move it into position.
     
  7. mm

    mm Guest

    I hadn't thought about that, but I had noticed that it stays on the
    tip without magnetism, even when the tip is horizontal.

    The tip won't slip out of the slot either, the advantage of Phillips
    head. I wonder how long until there are chrome torx screws for
    decorative places.

    Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
    me know if you have posted also.
     
  8. mc

    mc Guest

    The tip won't slip out of the slot either, the advantage of Phillips
    I don't know. Recall that it took Phillips about 40 years to catch on
    (invented in the 1940s, not really dominant until the 1980s if memory serves
    me right). Torx should catch on by the middle of the century...
     
  9. Chris Lewis

    Chris Lewis Guest

    Square drive (eg: Canadian "Robertson") are almost as good. I drove several
    hundred 3" deck screws through flooring yesterday - once put on the driver,
    they stayed put on the driver and could be started and driven without touching
    the screw.

    No cam-out either.

    I still think they should make the manufacture and sale of slotted and
    phillips screws a capital offence.
     
  10. Chris Lewis

    Chris Lewis Guest

    The best way to ensure that you can copy over the good partitions
    is to _not_ open the drive first.

    The safest way is to image copy the whole drive to a new drive. Put
    the old drive in a safe place, and try to repair the new drive's
    directory structure. Preferably doing a backup of the image you copied
    to the new drive before you diddle it, so you can start over _without_
    touching the old drive.

    The clicking is most likely retries (ie: gouged media, weak magnetics).
    You _can't_ fix that. You're unlikely to be able to repair even obvious
    mechanical faults either.
     
  11. Guest

    Thank you for identifing this screw as the Security Torx Plus. It does
    have a pin in the middle to warrant "Security". Now I just need to
    figure out where to get one.

    I want to thank everyone for responding. In one day, there are 50
    messages to help me identify a strange screw, offer help tips to
    unscrew it, and an explanation of clean room. Newsgroup and all you
    helpful people are awesome!

    I also read a lot of questions on what I am planning on doing, and lots
    of warnings on taking hard disc apart and killing it. I would like to
    answer these questions and clarify my position. First, you can read
    about what I am planning on doing here:
    http://www.gearhack.com/Forums/DisplayComments.php?file=Tool/Screwdriver_for_5-Point_Star_Screw.html

    As you can see, I am not talking about taking the internal hard drive
    apart (although I have done that in the past). But rather, I want to
    take the external case apart.

    Chieh
     
  12. Noozer

    Noozer Guest

    It's a "security" bit. Should be able to find one in most tool shops - NOT
    Home Despot, etc.
     
  13. J. Clarke

    J. Clarke Guest

    Unless you have the tools and skills to identify and repair a surface defect
    there's nothing much you can do by opening the drive that will "stop the
    clicking". Either copy as much as you can before it fails or send it to a
    data recovery company that has the necessary tools.
     
  14. mm

    mm Guest

    No, I was going to open the drive last, after all my software
    solutions failed. I'm sorry I didn't mention that.
    It only clicks if I try to access the bad partition, and even then not
    always . I can read the good partitions, but I'm told the clicking
    will get worse.

    Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
    me know if you have posted also.
     
  15. mm

    mm Guest

    That would be like making digitial tv the standard, and non-digital
    tv's dificult to use.

    Think of all the screwdrivers that would have to go on welfare.

    Remove NOPSAM to email me. Please let
    me know if you have posted also.
     
  16. Thanks for the URL, new that screw didn't look
    like regular torx but have seen that type of screw
    and certainly didn't know there were 3 different
    torx screws. Something new every day.
     
  17. I know they're already available special order, but I like the looks
    of stainless better anyway, and they're readily available.
     
  18. Just any unrecoverable read error (which isn't necessarily a physical one,
    it can just be a bad write, ie a logical error).
    Yes you _can_, for the logical bad blocks.
     
  19. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    Hard drives have very powerful neodymium magnets in the servo actuator
    for the read/write head assembly. You have to be careful not to pinch
    your fingers between them but they're cool to play with.
     
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