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Stereo Receivers dead after power surge but all fuses intact

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Mienie, Dec 28, 2003.

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  1. Mienie

    Mienie Guest

    I have two stereo recievers that are dead after a power spike
    (high-low on the pole on the corner of my block). I was hoping that it
    would be a simple matter of replacing a blown fuse, however, when I
    opened them up the fuses were fine. Both the one near the AC cord and
    those on the transformer.

    Any ideas on what the problem is or where I should start looking? I
    have a multimeter though I'm just getting up to speed on how to use
    it--and basic electronics! ;-)

    The receivers are a Pioneer VSX-454 and a Sony STR-D605. Looking
    around for cheap replacements reveals that low-end receivers no longer
    have phono inputs and this is a feature I often use so I'm definitely
    looking to fix these.
     
  2. Ken G.

    Ken G. Guest

    The power transformers have an internal thermal fuse hidden under the
    tape in the windings .
    Find the AC input wires on the transformer and test them with an ohm
    meter to see if its open .
    If you can find the thermal fuse you can jumper it but the trany will no
    longer have thermal protection .

    You can buy a simple phono pre amp to use a record player off any AUX
    input on modern stereos .
     
  3. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Mienie" bravely wrote to "All" (28 Dec 03 09:46:35)
    --- on the heady topic of "Stereo Receivers dead after power surge but all fuses intact"

    This is pretty much an initial basic electrical check. The first thing
    to check is the AC plug itself using the continuity beeper or the ohms
    range. Test each wire separately for conductivity. This seems pretty
    basic but often it is automatically ignored by a more experienced
    person. One has to use a systematic approach so that we can rely on what
    has already been tested with confidence. Then include the fuse, then the
    transformer primary, secondary, etc.

    I would only then apply power and check for a sign of voltage at the
    main supply filter electros using the DC volts range (always start at
    the highest range and work down to get a reading). If no DC voltage is
    present then I would look for AC at the input to the rectifier using the
    AC range. If none is present then something inbetween is open. Be very
    careful of live voltage, especially high DC voltage as this can produce
    tremendous sparking currents. Good luck!


    Mi> From: Mienie <>

    Mi> I have two stereo recievers that are dead after a power spike
    Mi> (high-low on the pole on the corner of my block). I was hoping that it
    Mi> would be a simple matter of replacing a blown fuse, however, when I
    Mi> opened them up the fuses were fine. Both the one near the AC cord and
    Mi> those on the transformer.

    Mi> Any ideas on what the problem is or where I should start looking? I
    Mi> have a multimeter though I'm just getting up to speed on how to use
    Mi> it--and basic electronics! ;-)

    Mi> The receivers are a Pioneer VSX-454 and a Sony STR-D605. Looking
    Mi> around for cheap replacements reveals that low-end receivers no longer
    Mi> have phono inputs and this is a feature I often use so I'm definitely
    Mi> looking to fix these.


    .... Over a hundred billion electrons were used in crafting this tagline.
     
  4. Me

    Me Guest

    thanks.

    JJ
     
  5. Me

    Me Guest

    Thanks!

    Jon
     
  6. You might want to check the smaller standby transformer, though Sony has
    discontinued the part for many of those.

    MarkZ .
     
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