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Star Shower motion button bypass

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by LouF, Dec 4, 2018.

  1. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    The Star Shower Motion laser decoration light has a motion button that toggles the motion on and off. Upon shutting off the power (either by switch or timer) the motion needs to be manually started. It appears to be a soft-switch, and I was thinking of trying to bypass it with, possibly, a capacitor. My thought is that upon power-up, current could flow simulating a manual push, and as it is charged the current flow would be impeded; I don't think a hard-switch would be the way to go. Any thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2018
  2. CircuitMaster

    CircuitMaster

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    Dec 17, 2016
    Thats done on purpose.

    A relay or Timer555 would be better. What is the power supply? If its "5VDC" a "T trigger" will do the job.
     
  3. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Do you have any technical information for the controller? A schematic perhaps? We need to know what the button actually does.... if it is a 'signal' source it is often possible to use a capacitor/resistor to create a start pulse.
     
  4. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    No schematic found. From one "hack", someone apparently ran it from a USB, so I'm assuming 5VDC. A pulse is exactly what I was thinking of trying to produce.
     
  5. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

    4,289
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    Jun 25, 2010
    A simple RC arrangement on a digital input pin will provide a 'switch-on reset' but without knowing the arrangement of the circuitry this might be risky.

    Potentially, and only potentially, if the switch has 5V across it during normal use then placing a small capacitor (say 100nF) across the switch contacts might be sufficient to get that pulse. The capacitor value might need changing (anywhere from the stated 100nF to 1μF is possible) but I stress, this is EXPERIMENTAL and conditional on 5V being present across the OPEN switch contacts when powered up.
     
  6. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    The device is supplied with 5VDC, and the switch appears to be operating with ~2.8VDC. I tried capacitors (47uF 16V and 1uF 50V, separately), and it did not work. Plus, I forgot that they will hold the charge. Shorting the contacts with a capacitor in place still toggled on/off motion.

    I was hoping to do a simple solution using fundamental components, but I see this may not cut it.
     
  7. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    No, could not find any information. It seems the button provides a change that is sensed. I can explain further, but I think you get it, and I wouldn't be able to provide the actual information you are talking about. I can only describe that it appears to be a bubble-contact type switch (feels, sounds), and it will conduct while depressed; pressing of the switch toggles on/off of this device's "motion" (a motor that provides kaleidoscope-type action); continued depression acts as one press, and it does not seem to damage the circuit or change function while being continually pressed. Action happens at first press, not on release.
     
  8. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    The switch has ~2.8VDC across it in normal use (the device is supplied with 5VDC). At the board, I tried capacitors across the switch (47uF 16V and 1uF 50V, separately), and it did not simulate a button push. Plus, I forgot that they will hold the charge. Shorting the contacts with a capacitor in place still toggled the device's motion on/off motion. (Reading charge across the capacitor with voltmeter after the all was shut off showed voltage dropping (until 0V)).
     
  9. CircuitMaster

    CircuitMaster

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    Dec 17, 2016
    A trigger will still do. The trigger will stay powered, because you will be activating its "set" pin. That will give a permanent 5VDC to the output of the trigger.
     
  10. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    I am just a tinkerer trying to get some familiarity and capability in electronics and may know only know enough to be dangerous (or a pest). My question about this now is: assuming this has to do with transistor PNP or NPN action in the circuit, does this switch provide a drain of the chip, or is it supplying a voltage to something.

    I am not familiar with something like this T-trigger, but I found similar wording (not exactly e.g. T flip-flop). I also came across talk about thyristors. Since the switch closes a circuit, will this T-trigger function as close?

    Relay: the whole unit is only supplied by a 5VDC, 2A external power supply. Are you meaning a coil-type relay?

    Also, may an inductor across the switch be a way to go?
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018 at 4:23 PM
  11. LouF

    LouF

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    Dec 4, 2018
    I have it working, but I haven't found a consistent time to use, especially from a dead start-up.
    I'm using 100uF cap. and I'm estimating a 63k resistance. 6>t>2 seconds works at times.
     
  12. CircuitMaster

    CircuitMaster

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    Dec 17, 2016
    The t trigger (T flip-flop is the same) when it receives a "5VDC" TTL voltage on its "Set" pin, it establishes its "Q" output in "5VDC" and stays that way. If it received a "5VDC" TTL voltage on its "Reset" pin, it establishes its "Q" output in "0VDC" and stays that way.

    If you want to switch the state of the "Q" output pin, all you have to do is apply an impulse to the clock pin for a short time (mS). That way you do not need to use the "Set" and "Reset" pins, but at every clock impulse the "Q" output will change.
     
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