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Stainless Steel nuts and bolts for Observatory

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by W. eWatson, Nov 30, 2012.

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  1. W. eWatson

    W. eWatson Guest

    I finally discovered someone who can put a control system in my
    observatory. To get prepared for the big day the work begins, January, I
    need a fairly large number of nuts.

    The contractor suggests that EBay is the place to get them at much lower
    prices than the big h/w stores. Googling: "stainless steel nuts bolts
    ebay", gives a ton of distributors. Can someone single out one or so of
    these that has good prices?

    Maybe DigiKey or Grainger have competitive prices.

    In the meantime, I'll be looking for local prices in our small town.
     
  2. Tom Biasi

    Tom Biasi Guest

    Amen! An associate of mine bought "grade 8" bolts from a Chinese
    supplier that would break at hand torque.
    (Not to disparage all Chinese suppliers)
     
  3. notbob

    notbob Guest

    I can't tell you their prices are the lowest, but I can assure you
    their inventory is top notch. This little vendor has supplied giant
    Silicon Valley corporations with the oddball gotta-have-it-yesterday
    stainless steel fasteners for decades. I spent so much time at their
    counter, I felt like an employee.

    http://www.olander.com/

    nb
     
  4. W. eWatson

    W. eWatson Guest

    As a means of comparison, I went down to our local h/s store. Here are a
    few prices for 100 boxed items. (I found the button bolts did not come
    in boxes of 100. Probably not a big seller. I changed to Phillip heads.)

    100 2" 1/4" Phillips, $48
    100 1/4-20 fender, $29
    100 Nylock 10-24, $21
    100 Nylock 1/4-20, $12.50
     
  5. P E Schoen

    P E Schoen Guest

    "W. eWatson" wrote in message
    Try www.mcmaster.com. They have decent prices and fast service. I've also
    dealt with MSC and Fastenal.

    Also try surplus places:
    http://deepsurplus.com/HOME/Nuts-Washers/10-32-Hex-Nut-Stainless-Steel-Bag-of-100
    http://www.surplusunlimited.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=1&Category_Code=2175-03
    http://www.merchantcircle.com/business/B.And.B.Surplus.Inc.661-589-0381

    or this:
    http://www.nutty.com/

    Paul
     
  6. chas

    chas Guest

    **************
    Working in a chemical plant for a steel erector as an ironworker, we had to
    use 'Anti-seize' on all the stainless connectors. Else we could not take
    the nuts off the bolts without Air-arcing
     
  7. Guest

    McMaster has excellent service, too. For more woodsy sorts of
    products, McFeeleys is also good.
     
  8. W. eWatson

    W. eWatson Guest

    I suppose one way to deal with this is if one needs say 4-5 boxes, order
    one box and check it out somehow. Maybe compare a few bolts with ones
    bought locally. I'm not sure what simple test might work.
     
  9. W. eWatson

    W. eWatson Guest

    This is interesting. I see they are in Sunnyvale, CA. I'm 180 miles
    away, but visit friends there every few months. In fact, I should be
    there around Dec. 10.
     
  10. tuinkabouter

    tuinkabouter Guest

    Stainless steel is not magnetic.
     
  11. P E Schoen

    P E Schoen Guest

    "W. eWatson" wrote in message
    The issues seem to have been strength. So you could clamp a bolt in a vise
    and then thread a nut onto it and use a big breaker bar or torque wrench to
    see how much it will take. If it survives, examine the threads to see if
    there is any sign of distortion or damage. There is also the issue of
    galling, which can be minimized by using an anti-seize compound.

    You can also do a hardness test with a center punch and a hammer which
    should be dropped from the same height to compare the new nuts to some known
    good ones. A magnet test can determine if it is alloy 18-8, which is less
    expensive and slightly magnetic, or alloy 316 which is essentially
    non-magnetic and more costly.

    http://www.ssina.com/overview/alloy.html
    http://www.bosunsupplies.com/stainlessinfo2.cfm
    http://www.onlinemetals.com/stainlessguide.cfm
    http://www.americanfastener.com/technical/non-ferrous.asp
    <https://www.kimballmidwest.com/cata...r Primer - Stainless Steel By Guy Avellon.pdf>
    http://www.boltscience.com/pages/faq.htm
    <http://www.fastenal.com/content/feds/pdf/Torque of Stainless Steel, Non ferrous Torque.pdf>
    http://www.engineershandbook.com/Tables/torque3.htm
    http://www.designnotes.com/companion/manual-1.html
    http://www.stainless-steel-tube.org/Hardness-Testing.htm
    http://www.bssa.org.uk/topics.php?article=1

    Some interesting material in some of those links.

    Paul
     
  12. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    mostly non magnetic, it'll stick weakly to stong magnets.
     
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