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Specification for my custom CPU

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Mossesdc, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. Mossesdc

    Mossesdc

    3
    0
    Jun 1, 2016
    Hello,

    I'm planning to build a custom CPU for gaming. This is my custom specification.
    processor - Intel Core i5 4690 @ 3.5GHz,
    RAM - 16 GB low voltage,
    Hard Drive - 500 GB Samsung 850 EVO Series SSD,
    Video Card - 2 x GeForce GTX 980, 4GB.
    I have talked with one sheet metal fabricator for an aluminum cabinet. I wish to include red led lights to illuminate inside the cabinet. Before I start, I want to be sure, if the specs I choose are good.
     
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    That's not a custom CPu, that's a custom PC. The CPU would be the Intel core i5 (CPU = Central Processing Unit).
    But why go for an i5 4xxx? That's generation 2014. Current top of the line is core i5 6xxx.

    You may want to include a second harddrive (magnetic) with 1 or 2 TByte for storing large amounts of data. A 500GByte SSd can quickly be filled, depending on the amount of software you install.
     
    Gryd3 likes this.
  3. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Why use a custom metal fabricator? PC cases are readily available over a wide range of prices, sizes, and bells and whistles (including LED illuminated interiors).
     
  4. Mossesdc

    Mossesdc

    3
    0
    Jun 1, 2016
    I misspelled CPU for PC. Thanks for the suggestions. And I thought custom building the case would give some more unique designs at a less costly rate.
     
  5. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    9,137
    1,846
    Nov 17, 2011
    Unique: yes.
    Less costly: I doubt it. Get an offer nad compare is to off-the-shekf cases. As these are mass produced, they can be less expensive. Plus you neeed to consider the right placement for all the holes and openings for mounting motherboard, power supply, fans(s) etc.
     
  6. Mossesdc

    Mossesdc

    3
    0
    Jun 1, 2016
    okay, so may be I should not go for custom building the case. Let me do more homework on the charges . Thanks for the advice
     
  7. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,203
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    Jun 21, 2012
    For the last thirty years, it has always cost about US$2000 to build the best personal computer you need using current technology. Of course you can always spend more money, but it is unlikely you will need to. The extra cost will be for "bragging rights" more than for any improved and useful performance. For on-line gaming, you will find the Internet connection speed is your main performance limitation... unless you live in Japan or Taiwan where everyone expects warp speeds equal to or greater than one gigabit per second.

    The cost of the case has always been roughly one to ten percent of the total cost, rising somewhat in recent years as people began to appreciate the advantages of sturdy powder-coated steel versus aluminum construction. Most desktop cases feature multiple internal fans for cooling, plug-and-play bays for hard-disk drives and optical disk drives or (gasp!) floppy-disk drives and even cartridge tape drives. Most case manufacturers also incorporate front panel access to a reset button, audio jacks, and USB connectors via a cable you plug into the motherboard (mobo).

    The choice of mobo can be critical to on-line gaming. Do a LOT of on-line research at various gaming forums and see what the current, latest-and-greatest mobo value is. Best value is not necessarily the highest performing or the least expensive mobo. Rely on the experience of other gamers for suggestions. The life-expectancy of a modern mobo can be measured in years (or even decades), but the technology it incorporates will be "obsolete" before you even take delivery. Manufacturers are constantly making new mobo versions to take advantage of the latest technology. It is impossible to keep up and foolish to even try.

    Good luck with your build! I always get a thrill from a new computer build when the BIOS boots up for the first time.
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    that has dropped substantially over recent years. I have always build up my own PC's the first one in 1990 a 286 processor and a 40MB HDD cost a fortune. The HDD on its own was NZ$450 :eek:
    the PC I'm typing this on I built up june last year ... an i5 3.4 GHz, Gigabyte MOBO, 2 gig ram and 2 x 2TB HDDs, cost about AU$600-700 in total

    new PC cases WITH PSU are around $50 for a standard and up to $80 for something fancier

    Dave
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  9. Herschel Peeler

    Herschel Peeler

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    Feb 21, 2016
    I'm not a gamer but that doesn't sound like a state-of-the-art (2017 era) system to me. Considering it will take you a year to get into production. By the time you got it built it would be obsolete.
    Find out what systems are being designed for next year and build for that.
     
    Mossesdc likes this.
  10. shumifan50

    shumifan50

    548
    56
    Jan 16, 2014
    I have a PC with 2 x 120GB SSD drives. They are magical for booting and loading programs(Windows 7 boots in about 10 seconds). HOWEVER, go read around the web about setting them up. Unless the technology has vastly improved in the last year(last time I looked) they suffer from slowing down seriously when volatile files are stored on them, so they are best used for storing programs, load modules etc, but not suitable for storing swap files etc that changes all the time. If I remember this has to do with the write process when rewriting data bytes. It has nothing to do with fragmentation, as matter of fact you should never defrag an SSD.
    I am not a gamer, but as far as I can work out the most important part of the PC for gaming purposes is the graphics card. Here it matters how many cores it has and how fast they are and how much memory it has on board. Much of the gaming code is actually executed on the graphics card (if it is supported by the game) as the graphics processors are much quicker than the main CPU. The moral of the story, as far as I can tell, is buy the best graphics card you can afford as it will give the most benefit.
     
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