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Speaker repair - frame to cone wires?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Charlie+, Aug 15, 2012.

  1. Charlie+

    Charlie+ Guest

    Needed for a big do in about a week so quick and dirty repair required
    but be better if the repairs lasted!
    I tried a repair on these speakers about a year ago for my sisters
    family but the repair hasnt lasted... I used uncoated a fine
    multistrand copper spiral twisted wire for the tagboard to cone
    connections - industry uses a knitted wire for this , any suggestions
    for a longer lasting material? Guessing these are abot 80W ~10"
    speakers being used at high volumes, vibration stress of the wires is
    the failure not electrical.
    Anyone been down this road? Thanks
     
  2. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest


    Tinsel wire is the term.

    Maybe not fine/multistrand enough. I have used extra-flexible "hook-up" wire
    about 60 strands, .05mm diam strands , sleeving stripped off. Then plaited
    so 3 ply for the current carrying. All I can say is the speakers have not
    bounced back.
     
  3. N_Cook

    N_Cook Guest

    If such multistrand not available then skein some .05mm wire and taking 5
    strands together lightly plait 3 such bunches, plait those together , repeat
    3 times and plait those together. Trying to keep the plaiting as loose as
    possible.
     
  4. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Charlie+"

    ** I regularly strip the " tinsel " leads from speakers that are no longer
    usable - for just your purpose.

    So find some old woofers, quality immaterial and do likewise.

    Or, try eBay:

    http://www.ebay.com.au/sch/i.html?_...nkw=speaker+tinsel+&_sacat=See-All-Categories



    ..... Phil
     
  5. Charlie+

    Charlie+ Guest

    Thanks for the link and suggestions folks, ill get some on eBay, hope it
    arrives intime from US or have to do a fix and redo after with the
    proper tinsel wire later! Havnt' got any duff speakers about..
     
  6. gregz

    gregz Guest

    Solder sucker wire ?

    Greg
     
  7. Close-woven braiding from screened cable can be used, even though it is
    not ideal; if you thread cotton down the centre, it can help to
    distribute the flexure over a greater length and will prolong its life.
    Make up a hank of many strands of carpet thread and pull it through the
    centre of the braiding with a loop of tinned copper wire.

    Even better than cotton is a single strand of spring steel wire, such as
    piano wire. It needs to be carefully tinned before threading it through
    the braiding, then it will solder to the end connections and distribute
    the bending.

    If you solder any kind of flexible wire, there will be a sharp bending
    point where the solder finishes. Try to support it flexibly for a short
    distance beyond this point, otherwise it will soon fracture. With a
    little ingenuity, silicone rubber sleeving and hot-melt adhesive can be
    used to achieve the desired effect.

    Never use a straight connection, always allow a fair degree of slack in
    the braiding - ideally take it around a 90-degree bend or even a right
    angle so as to distribute the bending. If there is no alternative to
    having the end connections in line with the movement, form the length of
    braid into one turn of a helix so that it behaves like a compression
    spring.
     
  8. Close-woven braiding from screened cable can be used, even though it is
    not ideal; if you thread cotton down the centre, it can help to
    distribute the flexure over a greater length and will prolong its life.
    Make up a hank of many strands of carpet thread and pull it through the
    centre of the braiding with a loop of tinned copper wire.

    Even better than cotton is a single strand of spring steel wire, such as
    piano wire. It needs to be carefully tinned before threading it through
    the braiding, then it will solder to the end connections and distribute
    the bending.

    If you solder any kind of flexible wire, there will be a sharp bending
    point where the solder finishes. Try to support it flexibly for a short
    distance beyond this point, otherwise it will soon fracture. With a
    little ingenuity, silicone rubber sleeving and hot-melt adhesive can be
    used to achieve the desired effect.

    Never use a straight connection, always allow a fair degree of slack in
    the braiding - ideally take it around a 180-degree bend or even just a
    right angle so as to distribute the bending. If there is no alternative
    to having the end connections in line with the movement, form the length
    of braid into one turn of a helix so that it behaves like a compression
    spring.
     
  9. Charlie+

    Charlie+ Guest

    Thanks, i thaught of that but originally i thaught probably a bit too
    heavy and if it hit self resonance might tear the cone .. might be
    wrong but ....!
     
  10. Charlie+

    Charlie+ Guest

    Thanks for your suggestions, my sister managed to track down a source of
    the correct silver tinsel wire in UK (speaker repairers to the pop/PA
    industry) so problem solved as long as the RoyalMail doesnt lose the
    envelope!!
     
  11. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Charlie+"
    ** Nice.

    Far better to use the correct wire - cos even that is barely good enough
    sometimes.


    ..... Phil
     
  12. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Phil Allison"
    **Anecdote:

    A few years ago, I had an Alesis brand monitor speaker (6.5 inch plus 1
    inch) to fix - with a customer complaint of " no sound". An ohm meter check
    showed a dead short at the terminals, but strangely the woofer cone was
    moving freely under finger pressure.

    Unscrewed the woofer and could hardly believe what I found - the woofer's
    two tinsel wires were joined in the middle, like Siamese twins !!

    After separating the wires, a test with low frequency sine waves revealed
    the problem - with 60Hz to 80 Hz drive both leads vibrated towards each
    other and it was possible for them to meet in the middle.

    I had to shorten each lead by over 2cm and give them a 1/4 turn twist in the
    terminal holes to fix the issue - then did the same procedure to the other
    box in the pair, which proved to be almost as bad.



    .... Phil
     
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