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Speaker problem: low volume output with buzz, normal when pressed on a corner

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by lampardlb, Nov 15, 2011.

  1. lampardlb

    lampardlb

    7
    0
    Nov 11, 2011
    Hello everyone:
    I have a pair of vintage B&O Redline 35 speakers with this problem: when contacted to the receiver, it delivers quite low volume output with buzz (just imagine the sound a headphone makes when the plug is not completely plugged in the dock), but if I press it on a corner of the cone, everything becomes perfect, it begins to make very beautiful music.
    I've removed the speaker from the whole body and tested it. It appears that if I press the same corner on the spider, it will make the same effect to bring the speaker back to normal.
    So I think the problem is clear: some certain parts in the spider or the inner coil have bad contact with others due to the age of the speaker. But I don't know how to fix it. Sure, I can attach a paper roll with scotch tape to keep the pressure, but obviously it's not the best way... So if any of you could give your opinion on how to repair this speaker, I would be very thankful.

    Cheers
    lampardlb
     

    Attached Files:

  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,191
    2,692
    Jan 21, 2010
    My suspicion is that the rubber at the edge of the cone has deteriorated with age (or has been broken and "fixed").

    The rubber roll at the edge performs 2 important functions. Firstly it provides a flexible connection that allows the cone to move back and forth but stops it flapping around. Secondly (and importantly I suspect in this case) it also helps keep the voice coil centred in the gap between the magnets.

    My hunch is that the coil is rubbing against the magnets. This will reduce the volume produced, and produce a buzz. Sounds a lot to me like what you're observing.

    You could try doing further repairs on the speaker, but you may have to accept that they need to be replaced.

    Google "speaker cone repair" and you'll find plenty of information. Here is one that was near the top (just the first one I clicked on).
     
  3. lampardlb

    lampardlb

    7
    0
    Nov 11, 2011
    Hi steve:
    Thanks for your reply. Actually the foam is still quite firm, it was the light that made it appear so. I prefer not to invest it now-I just need to keep some pressure on the coil and it can work properly. The information would be very helpful if this does not work out though.
     
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