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speaker phasing

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Nov 29, 2013.

  1. Here's the answer to your question about Boyle's Law (which you will ignore,
    of course)...

    PV = k assumes a constant temperature. If the temperature changes, then PV
    changes. The relationship is no longer linear, and as the air trapped in the
    cabinet is supposedly providing a significant part of the restoring force, the
    cone's displacement will not be as linear. (Duh... Get it?)

    This is what WDW is talking about when he says "As SF6 is an 'ideal gas', it
    operates as an 'isothermal' spring, thus avoiding the problems with
    'acoustic-suspension' loudspeakers that operated partially as an isothermal
    and partially as an adiabatic system. Some designers seemed to lave little
    knowledge of Boyles Law or the Laws of Thermodynamics."

    There is no such thing as an ideal gas, so WDW is wrong on this particular
    point. However, if SF6 is significantly closer to being an isothermal gas than
    air is, * then what he says makes sense. QED.

    Gotcha! Finally got ya!

    You may now jump up and down, Rumplestiltskin, until you break through the
    floor.

    * I can't find anything on this at the moment. But I'm looking.
     
  2. But But But but!!!!!

    :)
    Jamie
     
  3. "Maynard A. Philbrook Jr." wrote in message
    Indeed. Hoist with his own petard.

    The best part is that the point was reasonable, so I had to do some research.
    In the process, I learned something.
     
  4. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker"
    ** PV= k shows that it does not matter what the gas is - the same volume
    changes produce the same pressure changes.

    So the stiffness of an enclosed volume of gas is the same for all gasses.

    The resonance frequency of a woofer will be unaffected by it.

    ** Yawnnnnnnnnnnnn.....


    Dunno who is the bigger LIAR.

    You or the fuckwit you are mindlessly quoting.



    ..... Phil
     
  5. "Phil Allison" wrote in message "William Sommerwanker"
    ** PV= k shows that it does not matter what the gas is - the same volume
    changes produce the same pressure changes.

    Uh... No it doesn't. k is temperature-dependent. Sorry about that,. but all
    you have to do is look it up.
    If a gas isn't perfect, then compressing (or rarefying it) changes its
    temperature. This causes the pressure to change more than that caused by the
    volume change. The result is a non-linear restoring force.

    That's not what we're talking about, Mr Anuson.

    I'm quoting physics books.
     
  6. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker"
    ** Yes it does.

    ** Irrelevant when there are simply no temperature changes going on.


    ** Yes it is.

    You bullshitting, tenth wit asshole.




    ..... Phil
     
  7. "Phil Allison" wrote in message
    ** Irrelevant when there are simply no temperature changes going on.

    They can occur when you compress (or rarefy) the gas. What do you think the
    terms "adiabatic" and "isothermal" refer to?
     
  8. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker"
    ** Yes it does.

    ** Irrelevant when there are simply no temperature changes going on.


    ** Yes it is.

    You bullshitting, tenth wit asshole.

    You simply have no case - so **** off.



    ..... Phil
     
  9. Consider the following statements:

    "For a fixed amount of an ideal gas kept at a fixed temperature, pressure and
    volume are inversely proportional."

    Right? Now this one...

    "Boyle's law is used to predict the result of introducing a change, in volume
    and pressure only, to the initial state of a fixed quantity of gas. The before
    and after volumes and pressures of the fixed amount of gas, where the before
    and after temperatures are the same (heating or cooling will be required to
    meet this condition), are related by the equation P1V1 = P2V2."

    See the disclaimer? Compressing/expanding a non-ideal gas heats/cools it.
    Assuming that both air and SF6 are non-ideal, this produces a non-linear
    restoring force. SF6 is supposedly closer to ideal, so it should provide lower
    distortion in a "true" acoustic-suspension system, where the gas provides a
    big percentage of the restoring force.

    You'd better give up, because I'm going to keep posting this until you do.
     
  10. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "William Sommerwanker"
    ** Yes it does.

    ** Irrelevant when there are simply no temperature changes going on.


    ** Yes it is.

    You bullshitting, tenth wit asshole.

    You simply have no case - so **** off.



    ..... Phil
     
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