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sound frequency resulting from coil windings

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by jikwan, Sep 25, 2016.

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  1. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    hi everyone
    i need to understand how to get a particular frequency
    from the coil winding
    i dont know how it works
    i am thinking that if you send current through a coil you ll
    get a certain frequency from a certain number of windings
    can someone help me with this?
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Frequency in (power)is frequency out.(sound wave)
    Motor coils act like speaker coil at high hz.
     
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  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    If you wind a coil loosely, the windings will move in the presence of the magnetic field and buzz in time with it.
     
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  4. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    @jikwan: Welcome to Electronics Point!

    Hows about telling us what you are trying to DO before winding any coils?
     
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  5. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    appreciate the replies.
    this way i can understand the subject by studying the small
    pieces you give. if i study the text book it might take
    much longer

    heres what im trying to do
    i have a metal object that i could strike, record the sound
    and put it through a sound editor programe and find the
    exact frequency of it
    im wanting an electrical wiring way of generating the same
    frequency from the wire
    say my object has a freq of 450 hz, i need 450 hz from the wire
    i can use a speaker that gives 450hz but i dont want to use
    that way
    is this possible you might ask----- its easily done using a
    tuning fork with 450hz freq
    everything, every object has a frequency
    so i listen to electric devices and hear a humm and think
    coil winding does that
    so exactly what im after is to place wire/ coils of wire near
    my metal object causing resonance in the ame way you
    get resonance using a speaker and tuning fork
    i ll give $20 000 for the formula


    i plan on buying some lottery tickets!
     
  6. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    i am thinking there is a sound that the wire makes
    i could record that sound and might find it to be say, 728hz
    and by shortening/lengthening it i ll get it to be exactly 440
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Thanks for the explanation. It tells us more about what you (mis) understand than what you want to do, but that's ok.

    Making a wire vibrate is *exactly* what a speaker does. It also has a surface (often a paper cone) attached to help make the air vibrate so we can hear it better.

    Also, a tuning fork and a speaker don't "resonate".

    And every object doesn't "have a frequency". In particular, any object that you strike will produce vibrations at many frequencies at different relative intensities which may vary over time and/or depending how hard, where, and with what you strike it.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
    hevans1944 and jikwan like this.
  8. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Getting sound from electricity requires a transducer (Google that!) to convert electrical energy into sound energy. There are many ways to do this both intentionally (loudspeaker) and unintentionally (transformer hum). To excite your metallic object (such as bell) with sound waves is different than exciting it electrically. Depending on the type of metal, it may be possible to excite it electrically using magnetostriction from a suitably placed coil of wire. Nickel, for example, contracts when inserted in a strong magnetic field and this effect is used to make very powerful ultrasonic transducers. But, as Steve noted, you still haven't told us what you are trying to DO. Or why the solution is worth big bux. More details, please.
     
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  9. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    i suspect i got a whole pile more misconceptions---i dont
    have many electrically minded friends
    so, i take it that all i have to do is take the speaker wire
    and disconnect it from the paper that makes it vibrate
    that wire will deliver say, the 440hz that i require
    if i solder that wire onto my metal object (which has the
    freq of 440).........it should vibrate at 440
    does that sound about right?
     
  10. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Windings don't have to be loose to play a tune....look at brushless motors.
     
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  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Well kinda...

    The speaker coil typically moves within a magnetic field. The coil is connected to the cone and it also "floats" in the magnetic field. The magnet and the cone are not connected (well the kind of are, but by flexible material allowing them to move independently.

    If you were to remove the cone, leaving in place the other stuff holding the coil, and attach the magnet to something solid, and the "metal" to the coil, you might be able to make tho work.

    A better alternative is a surface transducer that is designed to transfer vibration to the surface it is sitting on. There are rechargeable Bluetooth "speakers" of this nature that you could far more easily use.
     
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  12. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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  13. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    does a good job but uses a whopping 10A!
     
  14. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    thanks a lot for the great replies
    i do realize that the more information i give about what
    exactly im trying to do---the more appropriate the answers
    will be
    this ive been avoiding because the nature of the device im
    trying to design is considered too dangerous and this may
    well be the final post and the mods will lock the thread
    but maybe not, lets see...........

    ive been building devices that produce hydrogen for decades
    (on and off) and never had problems. hundreds of thousands
    have used these devices without much problem
    its exactly the same with electricity---if you know what youre
    doing its safe---dont know what your doing youll get burnt
    i simply need a stainless steel tube to vibrate in water at a
    certain frequency. and thats it---nothing more

    why do i want this? the hydrogen production increases x10

    if the moderators decide to close it im ok with it
    but if theyre flexible i will persue it

    big dollar? just joking
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2016
  15. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    If the stainless steel is magnetic then a solenoid coil could vibrate it. If it's non-magnetic then a piezoelectric transducer could do the job.
     
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  16. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    the transducer as i understand it reacts to pressure and change. the object it would be attached to is completely
    stationary. but if its switched on and it vibrates all by itself
    then that would do the job in a way. it would be used as
    a mechanical vibrator

    exactly what im after is resonance
    for example, the two forks of a tuning fork shake horizontally
    when theyre struck. both forks (tines) move out and in at the

    same time. thats the action i want. people have used
    vibrators before and found an improvement but nowhere
    near 10 times increase that im after

    one might ask..... has this resonant frequency ever been
    achieved? yes it has but no one is giving the formula away
     
  17. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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  18. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    It is known as the "brown note".
     
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  19. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    har har har har
     
  20. jikwan

    jikwan

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    Sep 25, 2016
    that is very cool, cheap and requires next to nothing power
    i may end up using a pile of them. thanks
     
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